Riverside Art Market Set For April 26th

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Marylin Jacobsen, published in the Press-Enterprise on April 3, 2014.)

Inland artists and crafts makers will display and sell their wares in front of the Riverside Main Library on April 26 at the new Riverside Art Market.  The free event is set for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Children will be able to try their hands at arts and crafts projects during the same hours.

Arts and crafts activities will be offered for children at the Riverside Art Market, set for April 26. Claire Stepien, 6, and her sister Olivia, 4, practice for the event. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

Arts and crafts activities will be offered for children at the Riverside Art Market, set for April 26. Claire Stepien, 6, and her sister Olivia, 4, practice for the event. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

Riverside Art Market is a new project of the Art Alliance of Riverside Art Museum to provide a venue for artists to show and sell their work and to raise money for the Riverside Art Museum. Watercolor and oil paintings, ceramics, graphic art, photography, weavings, jewelry, wood working and other forms of art will be found among the booths.

Among those who will have booths are Judy Davies Design, Marty Tobias, Helen Bell, Jan Lewis, Robert Collignon, Connie’s Creations, Sketches and Oils by C. Acid, Connie Lynn Pico, Lori Beilby, Joan Coffey, Zaza Faure Los Angeles, Mrs. Miller’s Hand Made Originals  (Annette Miller), Vis a Vis Jewelry, Ann Richmond and Michael Elderman.

Riverside artist Marty Tobias will show his paintings and etchings at a booth at Riverside Art Market on April 26 in front of the Riverside Main Library. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

Riverside artist Marty Tobias will show his paintings and etchings at a booth at Riverside Art Market on April 26 in front of the Riverside Main Library. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

An Art and Architecture Scavenger Hunt activity for $5 a person will be held three times in the day, with prizes awarded to the top five finishers from each start time. Start times are 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. in front of the Main Library. The walkable hunt will be a fun but challenging trip through downtown Riverside. Children, with adult supervision, are welcome .

A drawing will be held for a two-night stay and spa treatments at the Lavender Inn in Ojai. Tickets are available at the Museum, 3425 Mission Inn Ave., or by contacting Christine Cahraman of the Art Alliance at ramartsale@att.net.

The Riverside Art Market is a shining example of what makes Riverside a location of choice.  Events like this attract creative, entrepreneurial, dynamic and diverse people as residents, workers, business owners and visitors.  Riverside is one of the most inspiring, livable, healthy and adventurous cities to live in or visit. Our community provides an abundance of opportunities to be amazed, inspired and entertained.

Several food vendors will be at the Art Market, including Goodwin’s Organic food truck, Duke’s Wrap Delight, The Sweet Stop and Robert’s Tacos.

Booths for artists are available.

To read the full article, click here.

CBU Aviation Science Program Enters Agreement With ExpressJet Airlines

(This article contains excerpts from an article posted on Calbaptist.edu on March 24, 2014.)

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California Baptist University’s aviation science program has entered into a Pilot Pathway Interview Agreement with ExpressJet Airlines.  The agreement, which is the first to be initiated by CBU, guarantees qualified students an interview and preferential consideration for pilot hiring with ExpressJet, which operates contractually as United Express, Delta Connection and American Eagle.

Photo Credit: expressjet.com

Photo Credit: expressjet.com

“In addition to benefiting current students, this agreement is a significant student recruiting tool,” said Dr. Daniel Prather, chair of the department of aviation science. “Students can now see real benefit in attending CBU and majoring in aviation flight.”

The agreement is designed to provide opportunities for future employment at the airline for pilots completing training at CBU and meeting airline qualifications, including the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Airplane Multiengine Land and Instrument Airplane ratings, a CFI certificate, First Class Medical Certificate, background checks and letters of recommendation from CBU’s department of aviation science.

CBU’s efforts and commitment to education certainly illustrate the seizing our destiny pillar of intelligent growth.  For students, one of the greatest challenges they meet is finding a career path after graduation.  Providing students with the opportunity of future employment while they are completing their training at Cal Baptist holds great value to aviation science students.   This is just one example of how Cal Baptist University promotes intelligent growth by collaborating to build a stronger community for future Riversiders.

To read the full article, click here.

Eastside Apartments Set For Long-Awaited Overhaul

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Alicia Robinson, published in the Press-Enterprise on March 27, 2014.)

Built in the mid-1960s, the Grand Prix apartments on Seventh Street in Riverside’s Eastside neighborhood have clearly seen better days.

Shonda Herold, housing project coordinator with the city of Riverside, inspects a hole in the ceiling of one of three city-owned apartment buildings on Seventh Street on Wednesday, March 26, 2014. The city plans to replace the old buildings with new affordable housing units. Photo Credit: David Bauman

Shonda Herold, housing project coordinator with the city of Riverside, inspects a hole in the ceiling of one of three city-owned apartment buildings on Seventh Street on Wednesday, March 26, 2014. The city plans to replace the old buildings with new affordable housing units. Photo Credit: David Bauman

The seafoam-green paint is peeling from the wood trim on the boxy, flat-roofed building, and the kidney-shaped pool was long ago filled with dirt that has sprouted weeds. Now vacant and boarded up, the complex is weeks from being demolished, the first big step in a city plan to improve the neighborhood officials call Chicago/Linden because it’s near that intersection.

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Photo Credit: David Bauman

Within two years, the Grand Prix and two other apartment buildings on the block will be replaced by an affordable housing complex that will have something for the community – a public garden, children’s play area or a child care facility. It’s part of an estimated $16.8 million strategy to make the area safer and more attractive for those who live there.

Fixing up the area, which lies between Chicago and Dwight avenues and West Linden and Seventh streets, has been a priority for city officials since 2006, housing project coordinator Shonda Herold said.

The overall strategy, created by a consultant with community input, includes installing new landscaping and more streetlights, improving driveways and alleys, reopening two cul-de-sacs that have become places for loitering, and building a community center at Patterson Park that could offer library programs, a commercial kitchen for public use, and activities for youths and seniors.

Photo Credit: David Bauman

Photo Credit: David Bauman

Officials expect the process of building community support and involvement to take time, just as finding money and fixing buildings will. Councilman Andy Melendrez, who represents the area, said he’s heard mostly positive feedback and excitement about plans for the neighborhood. He said he knows making the plans a reality is “not anything that’s going to happen from one year to the next.”

Transforming old spaces into new places throughout the city is what makes Riverside a location of choice.  With the mission to improve quality of life in Riverside, our community takes pride on maintaining it’s well defined, welcoming neighborhoods.

To read the full article, click here.

 

King High Students Hear Veterans’ Experiences

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Dayna Straehley, published in the Press-Enterprise on March 21, 2014.)

U.S. veterans participate at King High Remembers. High school juniors interviewed 298 veterans and learned history from them Friday March 21. The crowd overflowed from the school gym into the multipurpose room and some classrooms.

U.S. Army Korean War veteran Charles Geitner, 85, an Illinois native now living in Fullerton, shares his experiences with Riverside King High School juniors Darrel Artiaga and Nicole Item. The school's 11th graders interviewed 298 veterans during King High Remembers on Friday March 21.  Photo Credit: Milka Soko

U.S. Army Korean War veteran Charles Geitner, 85, an Illinois native now living in Fullerton, shares his experiences with Riverside King High School juniors Darrel Artiaga and Nicole Item. The school’s 11th graders interviewed 298 veterans during King High Remembers on Friday March 21. Photo Credit: Milka Soko

The veterans were interviewed across tables in the school gym, multipurpose room and in classrooms by groups of two or three 11th graders, who asked about their war experiences, military life, homecoming, their opinion of their time in the service and current conflicts.

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When Sgt. Bert Frank got home from World War II after three years in the Army, he took off his uniform and threw it on the floor.  He didn’t put it back on until Friday, March 21, when he wore it to King High School in Riverside.  Frank, a 90-year-old Los Angeles resident, was among 298 veterans interviewed by high school juniors in the 14th annual King High Remembers. One of those students was his grandson Joel Frank.

Like many veterans, Frank, brought a scrapbook that included some mementos of happy experiences. He was in the Army from 1942 to 1945.

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Frank told students about the dances they had almost every week while he was stationed in the Philippines and USO shows with Bob Hope, King Kaiser and others. The Army showed movies, but almost all of them were interrupted by bombers that sent soldiers running for their fox holes.

The King High Remembers event that took place on Friday that allowed students to interview veterans represented the seizing our destiny pillars intelligent growth, and unified city.  By interviewing the veterans directly in small groups like this gave the high school students a very valuable opportunity to learn about not only our country’s history, but also the heritage and background of local heroes.  Speaking to veterans from different branches of military from numerous wars, the knowledge instilled from the veterans certainly exemplified intelligent growth, by equipping the students with information and knowledge that can’t be taught in textbooks.

The experiences shared and interaction between two different generations was a great example of Riverside being a unified city.  The students were able to have intimate conversations with a melting pot of veterans.  Veterans from numerous military branches in attendance ranged in war involvement, age, ethnicity, and background.  The diversity of attendees enabled the students to hear a broad perspective of experiences, and to understand the commonality among all of the veterans.   They were given the opportunity to respect and value the cultural heritage, distinct needs and varied input of each of the veterans, while proactively engaging with them across generational gaps.

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WAR TALLY

Some veterans served in two or more wars or did not list a war. Not all of the 361 who were expected showed up. Others arrived without advance notice, making for a total of 298, social studies teachers said.

WWII: 59

KOREAN WAR: 57

VIETNAM WAR: 149

COLD WAR: 48

GULF WAR: 21

IRAQ/AFGHANISTAN WARS: 17

To read the full article, click here.

 

 

Champions Council Focuses On Promoting Mentorship Programs For 2014

The Seizing Our Destiny Champions Council convened in late February and brainstormed possible projects for the Champions in 2014.  While focusing on the intelligent growth pillar, a common message seemed to surround the subject of mentoring.

Champions Council

After brainstorming and discussing potential projects and developments, the groups agreed on the fact that allocating their efforts toward mentorship programs would be a great task.  One focus would be on mentoring for high school seniors.  College bound or not, individuals in this age group play a pivotal role in developing a strong future for Riverside, and we want to make sure that each student has all of the guidance and resources they need to secure their future.

Champions Council1

Champions Council2

There was also discussion of business/entrepreneurial mentoring.  The plan is to research all mentoring opportunities in Riverside and report back to the council in April.  The next step will be determining how the council will support existing mentoring programs, as well as identify areas where mentoring may be lacking.  The Seizing Our Destiny Champions Council is excited to see the impact of growing mentorship programs and awareness in Riverside and improving the resources available.

Although the council was focusing on the intelligent growth pillar of the seizing our destiny initiative, developing our mentorship resources really touches all four pillars; intelligent growth, catalyst for innovation, location of choice, and unified city.  The fact that the task at hand relates to all four of the pillars in different ways makes this a real win.

The mission of intelligent growth is built upon growing the economy, raising the standard of living and managing a growing population.  Developing strong mentorship opportunities in the community is one of many paths to raising the standard of living in our beloved city and managing a growing population.

For more information, contact Teresa Rosales, Seizing Our Destiny Coordinator, at trosales@riversideca.gov

Council Votes To Add Sister City In Vietnam

(This article contains excerpts from article by Alicia Robinson, published in the Press-Enterprise on March 18, 2014.)

INTERNATIONAL SISTERS

Riverside will add Can Tho, Vietnam, to its already large collection of sister cities.  Riverside has sister city relationships with Sendai, Japan; Ensenada and Cuautla, Mexico; Obuasi, Ghana; Hyderabad, India; Gangnam, South Korea; Jiangmen, China; and Erlangen, Germany.

The ideas of “people to people” relationships and healing after war won out Tuesday, March 18, when the Riverside City Council narrowly voted to add Can Tho, Vietnam, as its ninth sister city.  The decision came after lengthy and impassioned public comments on the goals of the sister city program and whether having such a relationship in Vietnam would disrespect American veterans.

“The purpose is to promote peace and common understanding,” said Bill Gavitt, a Vietnam veteran. “It’s time to start helping others if we want to change their behavior.”

Vien Doan, a Vietnamese American physician who lives in Riverside, has spearheaded efforts to add Can Tho, Vietnam, to Riverside's sister city program.  Photo Credit:  Alicia Robinson

Vien Doan, a Vietnamese American physician who lives in Riverside, has spearheaded efforts to add Can Tho, Vietnam, to Riverside’s sister city program. Photo Credit: Alicia Robinson

The vote was 4-3. Councilmen Chris Mac Arthur, Steve Adams and Mike Soubirous dissented.

Riverside was among the earliest participants in the sister city program, which was created in 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to foster cultural, educational and economic exchange between countries. Riverside formed ties with Sendai, Japan, in 1957 and has since added sister cities in South Korea, China, India, Ghana and Germany, and two in Mexico.

Vien Doan, a Vietnamese American physician who lives in Riverside, helped revive the idea of a sister city in his native country in 2012. He personally met with veterans’ groups in the past year and a half to build support for the plan.  “We have every reason to hate communism,” he said, describing how his family was rescued by American soldiers during the war. “I will never forget the past, but the past will not determine my future.”

Mayor William “Rusty” Bailey has said his office spends about $10,000 on the sister city program annually, but most other costs are borne by the International Relations Council, a private nonprofit group that oversees the friendships and raises money for related events and travel.

Like Riverside, Can Tho is home to a university and a medical college, and it’s an agricultural center producing fruit and rice.

Adding Can Tho to Riverside’s collection of international sister cities is a model of the seizing our destiny pillar, unified city.  We are a caring community that has compassion for all of its inhabitants, and engages with one another for a better life for all.

Riversiders respect and value the cultural heritage, distinct needs and varied input of each of our neighbors, while proactively engaging them across historical dividing lines.  Riversiders are working together everyday to not only address local issues, but to also have a positive impact on the region, nation and world…

To read the full article, click here.

Wells Fargo UrbanLIFT Community Grant Program Awards $486,000 to Strengthen Neighborhoods

(This article contains excerpts from a Wells Fargo News Release dated March 7, 2014)

On March 7, 2014 Wells Fargo, announced its award for $458,600 to Habitat for Humanity Riverside (HFHR) and the Neighborhood Partnership Housing Services (NPHS) as part of the UrbanLIFT Community Grant Program with each organization receiving $229,300. Wells Fargo Grant

With the grant funds received, HFHR and NPHS will support neighborhood revitalization efforts that will include: NHFR’s Neighborhood Revitalizations Initiative helping to engage the community, creating holistic improvements and neighborhood cohesiveness, and further filling its mutual goal of creating safe, decent affordable housing.

NPHS will use grant dollars awarded to install solar panels on homes in Riverside County and to remove several dilapidated properties paving way for the construction of seven new affordable homes. These revitalization efforts fall under NPHS’ Sustainable Communities Catalyst Project, a multi-pronged redevelopment strategy which guides and prioritizes resources to targeted neighborhood clusters throughout the Inland Valley.

The UrbanLIFT community grant program is funded by Wells Fargo and operated by NeighborWorks America. The program is designed to provide support to local nonprofits for neighborhood revitalization projects in 25 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) with diverse populations that are impacted by foreclosures. Since its launch in February 2012, LIFT initiatives which is the parent for programs such as UrbanLIFT including the NeighborhoodLIFT and CityLIFT have helped create more than 5,000 homeowners with the support of down payment assistance and homebuyer education in collaboration with NeighborWorks America, members of the national nonprofit’s network and local city officials.

This is an example of a unified city and of people being brought together around common interests and concerns. Riverside is a caring community that has compassion for all its inhabitants, and engages with one another for a better life for all. To read the full news release by Wells Fargo click here, or visit their blog at blog.wellsfargo.com for more information.

Students Create New, Healthy Dessert Bar

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Whitney Waters, published in CBU’s The Banner on February 23, 2014.)

Create a dessert that is healthy, tasty and gives back to the community? Unheard of!  California Baptist University’s recently-opened Food Innovation Center and Angel Wings Bakery are combining forces to create a dessert bar that is both nutritious and tasty.

Provider Food Service has stated they will buy the product and donate all proceeds to Path of Life Ministries, a nonprofit that helps the homeless.  Angel Wings Bakery, a separate nonprofit, directs all of its proceeds to sustain the homeless services that Path of Life provides. They also train and give temporary employment opportunities to Path of Life guests.

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Every Friday, students gather at the Food Innovation Center off campus to experiment with and modify ingredients in everyday desserts. Students break into different teams, and each week they try to swap an unhealthy ingredient for something nutritious.

“We want to develop products that have more nutritional value but will still be marketable,” said Dr. Margaret Barth, professor of nutrition and food sciences and program director of the Nutrition and Food Sciences said.  CBU’s School of Business was offered to help by calculating the cost of creating the product and the profit margin, and graphic design students plan to design the wrapper for the finished product.

“The hardest part about the project is creating something that is nutritious, but still tastes good,” said Sarah Velez, senior nutrition science major.

Each week, the students are given new recipes from the Angel Wings Bakery, where they analyze the different ingredients and attempt to add nutritional value to the baked goods.  “It is definitely tough to be consistent,” Velez said. “Because we are separated in different teams, we have to keep detailed track of our steps in the process so that if we find something that works, we will know exactly what steps were taken in order to achieve it.”  Students are learning how to develop a marketable product and create a product that can be a consistent source of income for Path of Life.

The students that have dedicated their efforts to the Food Innovation Center on campus at CBU are a testament of seizing our destiny in many ways.  Pairing up with Angel Wings Bakery and Provider Food Service has enabled the program to be a real catalyst for innovation.  Getting the School of Business on campus to help manage the program has been a great resource for the program as well.  Collaborating to build the community is what transforms places into a location of choice.

To read the full article, click here.