Tag Archives: City of Riverside

Riverside Metro Area Ranked #1 For Small Business

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Elaine Pofeldt and published in CNBC.com on May 5, 2015.)

Photo Credit: David Liu, Getty Images

The annual Best Small Business Cities in America Study ranking of 25 cities is based on a weighted average of data on Biz2Credit’s customers across the country. It looks at the health of small businesses in each metro area, the rate of small-business creation and the economic ecosystem for entrepreneurs, including the cost of doing business, tax climate and local talent pool.

Biz2Credit analyzed 12,000 businesses with fewer than 250 employees from across the country. These firms were in operation for more than a year and had less than $10 million in annual revenues.

The Riverside-San Bernardino area shot to the top spot after scoring in the top five in average credit score, average annual revenue, number of employees and the BizAnalyzer score, which takes into account local economic factors, such as the cost of doing business and tax rate. It also finished in the top 10 for its thriving start-up culture. The average age of businesses in the area is 34 months.

Top 10 cities for small business

  1. Riverside-San Bernardino, California
  2. Chicago
  3. New York Metro
  4. Charlotte, North Carolina
  5. Las Vegas
  6. San Francisco-Oakland, California
  7. Miami-Fort Lauderdale, Florida
  8. Los Angeles
  9. Houston
  10. Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas
    (Source: Biz2Credit)

The Riverside-San Bernardino area is a hub for IT, advanced manufacturing, food processing, health and medicine and professional services. The ecosystem for growth companies is strong, since it has such resources as incubators, accelerators and co-working spaces, as well as a Shop Riverside campaign to promote local businesses.

According to the survey, small businesses in Riverside-San Bernardino had average annual revenues of $1,400,960, ahead of the No. 2 city, New York, where average annual revenues were $1,269,859. San Francisco-Oakland placed third, with average annual revenues of $671,000.

“Technology is bringing in younger people and more immigrants to this metro area,” explained Rohit Arora, CEO of Biz2Credit. “Riverside, California, has a pretty big immigrant population.” It includes immigrants from Southeast Asia, Central America and the Middle East.

Nathan Sklar, a health-care entrepreneur, recently expanded his business operations from New York City to Riverside, California. In Manhattan he runs three entities: Comprehensive Kids Developmental School, a not-for-profit school for children with autism; Grand Street Medicine and Rehab, an outpatient facility for occupational physical therapy; and Comprehensive Evaluations, which provides evaluation services for children. Together they employ about 250 people.

He opened Comprehensive Certified Home Health Services in Riverside, California, five to six years ago. It is a home-care agency that provides nursing services, home health aides and related services, employing about 50 people. Sklar branched out into California during a moratorium on home-care licenses in New York. California had no moratorium.

“We’ve been growing at a steady pace,” he said, adding that between his New York and California operations, his ventures bring in combined revenue that range from $15 million to $25 million annually.

Riverside embraces economic growth and directs it so it maintains and improves our already outstanding quality of life. This ranking is yet another example of Riverside continuing to fuel the intelligent growth of the city and region.

For the full article, click here.

RCC’s School Of Nursing Lands Two Grants

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in RCC Campus News on May 11, 2015.)

Riverside City College’s School of Nursing has received two Song-Brown Grants, totaling $325,000. In announcing the awards, Lupe Alonzo-Diaz, deputy director of California’s Healthcare Workforce Development Division, cited RCC’s “continued efforts to deliver primary care services in areas of unmet needs.”

RCC was one of four community colleges selected for a Registered Nurse Education Capitation grant out of 17 applicants.
Its $200,000 award trailed only Cal State Northridge, which received $240,000.

RCC’s School of Nursing will use the funds to address the RN shortage in Riverside, San Bernardino, Orange, and Los Angeles counties. RCC will hire more full-time faculty to provide instruction and support, and admit an additional 10 students into the traditional Associate Degree in Nursing program. Students admitted into Nursing 11 will have their clinical rotation at one of RCC’s partner hospitals, all located in medically underserved areas. These hospitals serve a patient population with a very high percentage of Hispanic and Spanish-only-speaking individuals. The 10 students will be expected to complete the ADN program and qualify to take the NCLEX exam. Based on historical data, after graduation as many as 90 percent of them will secure employment in the local communities.

RCC’s School of Nursing is one of only 27 nationally accredited associate degree in Nursing programs in California, and has demonstrated great success in attracting and admitting members of minority groups into its RN program. Between 2002 and 2014, the applicant pool of students seeking admission to the RCC ADN program increased three-fold, with 911 applicants for 160 slots, 58 percent who are minority/disadvantaged.

The program also secured a $125,000 Song-Brown Grant for the Registered Nurse Education Programs. The grant will allow the program to implement an articulated associate degree-to-bachelor’s degree Nursing Pathway in coordination with local BSN programs. A growing body of research suggests that a BSN prepares nurses for greater professional responsibility and more complex practice. It also suggests that having a higher proportion of BSN-prepared nurses on staff in hospitals is linked to better patient outcomes. In its October 2010 report on The Future of Nursing, the Institute of Medicine states “an increase in the percentage of nurses with a BSN is imperative as the scope of what the public needs from nurses grows, expectations surrounding quality heighten, and the settings where nurses are needed proliferate and become more complex.”

The School of Nursing was one of just eight programs in the state to receive full funding.

Grants like these increase the great work done at RCC and help equip our nursing students with the knowledge needed to succeed. RCC’s effort to develop programs the meet the needs of employers is a great example of Seizing Our Destiny intelligent growth pillar.

CBU Wins Third PacWest Commissioner’s Cup

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in CBU News and Events on May 7, 2015)

Photo Credit: CBU News & Events

For the second year in a row, California Baptist University has won the PacWest Commissioner’s Cup by a good cushion, according to an announcement by the PacWest Conference today.

Since joining the conference during the 2011-12 season and winning their first Commissioner’s Cup, the Lancers have won the Cup three times, becoming the first program to do so. CBU is also just the second school to take home back-to-back awards after claiming the Cup last year and has never finished outside of the top two in the standings.

“Winning the Commissioner’s Cup for the third time in four years is a big accomplished for our student athletes, coaches and staff members,” said Director of Athletics Dr. Micah Parker. “We’ve had to continue to improve as a department because the PacWest has become so much stronger than when we won this for the first time four years ago. This accomplishment reflects the hard work of our coaches who are recruiting the right student athletes for CBU and then developing them each year. I’m proud to work with so many people who want to Honor Christ through excellence in athletics.”

CBU ended the winter in the top spot in the race for the Cup, leading rival Azusa Pacific by .429 of a point (12.429 to 12.000) heading into the spring. In the last standings, the Lancers had increased their lead to almost a full point, 12.611 to 11.677, after capturing their third PacWest conference title in women’s golf by a dominant 34 strokes. With the conclusion of both baseball and softball’s regular seasons, CBU finishes the year with a score of 12.682, towering over the Cougars’ 11.091 mark.

The PacWest Commissioner’s Cup was established in 2007-08 to honor the athletic program with the best overall performance in that academic year. The competition is based upon average finish in PacWest sports. Each school’s points are totaled and then divided by the number of PacWest athletic programs it offers, giving an overall average finish for the school. Since not every team in the conference sponsors the same sports, the PacWest Commissioner’s Cup Standings are based upon average finish instead of point totals. Each school’s points are totaled and then divided by the number of PacWest athletic programs it offers, giving an overall average finish for the school.

CBU’s outstanding scholastic and athletic performance makes it a location of choice for students seeking not only a great education but a first-rate sports program.

For the complete article, click here.

Norte Vista Academy Builds Careers

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Sandra Stokley and published in The Press Enterprise on May 8, 2015.)

Photo Credit: Stan Lim, The Press Enterprise

When Wells Middle School student Yuly Quintero heard about Norte Vista High School’s newly minted Green Construction Academy, she knew it was where she wanted to be.

“It just seemed so cool to do things other girls don’t do,” she said.

Quintero, now 15 and a sophomore at the Riverside high school, said the academy has exceeded her expectations. She has designed and built miniature replicas of buildings and bridges, and learned how to use hand and power tools.

And on a recent Tuesday, Quintero and about 39 of her academy classmates were put through the paces by trained professionals during a daylong boot camp at the Electrical Apprenticeship Training Center in San Bernardino. They learned to use a defibrillator in a CPR class, fashioned metal conduits, ran wires and learned some of the “hair-raising” aspects of electrical safety.

Now wrapping up its third year at Norte Vista, the academy is a school within a school that blends academic and career technical education to engage students who lack motivation or are at risk of dropping out to help them prepare for careers in the building trades or college – or both. Programs like this are great examples of Seizing Our Destiny’s catalyst for innovation and intelligent growth pillars. The people and educational institutions of Riverside cultivate and support programs that help improve our already outstanding quality of life.

“We’re reaching a student population that maybe we overlook,” said Gary Packler, the academy’s coordinator. “The academy is a way to connect them to school.”

MAKING CONNECTIONS

The program is funded by a California Department of Education grant with support from the Alvord Unified School District and business partners. It focuses on jobs in clean technology and renewable energy in industries such as solar energy and wind energy.

Other Inland schools with grants for Green Construction academies are: Arroyo Valley High School in San Bernardino and Desert Hot Springs High School in the Palm Springs Unified School District.

Norte Vista’s Green Academy started in 2012 with a freshman class of 30 students recruited from the district’s four middle schools.

Students in that initial class – who will be seniors in fall – and from subsequent years take four classes per day together and advance through the academy as a group.

“It creates a smaller learning environment,” Packler said. “It promotes a connection between teacher and students.”

Students take academic courses including English, mathematics and science. Mixed in are a freshman class of wood shop, and sophomore and junior construction technology courses.

Students also observe and work at a solar panel installation work site, Packler said.

APPRENTICE OPPORTUNITIES

On May 5, 40 academy students gathered at the San Bernardino apprenticeship center, where they got a taste of what to expect if they opted to try for a spot in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers’ apprenticeship program instead of going to college.

“It’s a very demanding program,” said Jim Rush, the Brotherhood’s business representative, who helped organize the boot camp.

Rush said applicants need a high school diploma or GED, must pass an exam that tests their math, reading and writing comprehension skills and be interviewed by the apprenticeship committee.

In the five-year training program, apprentices work five days a week with a contractor and attend school two nights a week.

The payoff can be substantial, Rush said. He earns about $100,000 per year.

Sophomore Johnny Conriquez, 16 said he heard about the Green Academy at Loma Vista Middle School and thought it would suit him for a couple of reasons.

“I like working with my hands,” he said. “And I like that we’re helping the environment.”

The academy has been so successful that participants have asked to help recruit at middle schools, Packler said.

“Some of these students would never have volunteered to go to middle school,” Packler said. “But they have developed so much confidence and social skills.”

To read the full article, click here.

Program Brings Science to University Heights Students

(This article contains excerpts from the article posted in the RUSD news feed.)

Photo Credit: The Press Enterprise
Photo Credit: The Press Enterprise

A group of about 50 University Heights Middle School students spent their day on Thursday, April 23 hiking Sycamore Canyon and learning about the plants and animals there as part of the SISTERS program – Success in Science and Technology: Engagement with Role Models. The girls got a chance to interact with a UC Riverside professor as well as the UC Riverside Science Ambassadors. This was just one of many fun and informative interactions the girls have had as they have spent the year exploring science in hands-on activities. They also have spent time in a college laboratory and visited the Riverside Metropolitan Museum. It’s all designed to give young women hands-on experience in STEM fields to encourage them that they can succeed in and pursue careers in these areas. It is hoped that this pilot program soon can be expanded to serve other schools as well.

Programs like this are great examples of Seizing Our Destiny’s catalyst for innovation pillar. Encouraging students to pursue an education in STEM is no easy task, but the UCR students can relate to the young girls and encourage them to purse a career in the STEM field. Creativity and innovation permeate all that we do, which makes our community a trendsetter for the region, California, and the world to follow.

To read a in-depth article about the program, click here.

Feeding The Needy, One Swipe At A Time

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Mojgan Sherkat and published in UCR Today on May 1, 2015.)

Co-founder Rafid Sikder and Senior Director of Dining Services David Henry (Photo Credit: UCR Today)

It started out as an idea, and now they’re seeing the impact of the fruits of their labor. Students at UC Riverside worked with Dining Services to launch a campus chapter of Swipes for the Homeless, and after two years of working toward that goal, they finally kicked things off during the 2014 winter quarter. And on April 30, the chapter donated about $5,000 worth of food and products to charity. How did they make that happen? Here’s a little background…

From left to right: Rafid Sikder, Lanette Dickerson (Executive Chef for Residential Dining), and David Henry. Photo Credit: UCR Today

Students who live in the residential halls have meal plans and dining cards. At the end of every quarter, the remaining meals on those dining cards “disappear.” That’s where Swipes for Homeless comes in. During the 10th week of every quarter the chapter asks fellow students to donate the meals they have left on their dining cards, and those meals are turned into cash by Dining Services. That cash is then used in two ways – it’s used to purchase food that’s donated to Feeding America, and it’s used to buy products for R’Garden, which are planted and grown, and then donated to community homeless shelters.

“It’s a huge sustainability and socially responsible project,” said Dave Henry, senior director for dining services. “So many people hear and see the problems our communities face, but don’t act on it. These students decided to do something about it, and that’s inspiring.”

UCR students are allowed to donate up to three meals at this time. During the 2014 winter quarter, Swipes for the Homeless collected nearly 2,000 meals from more than 600 students.

Sysco handing off the donated food to Feeding America. Photo Credit: UCR Today

Rafid Sikder is the co-founder of the UCR chapter of Swipes for the Homeless. He said he wanted to start the organization after noticing the poverty issues facing the community. “I feel fortunate that I got to start it, get it done and work with passionate people – I’m incredibly happy to see what we’ve accomplished in this one quarter,” he said.

The chapter raised about $5,000 during winter quarter alone. They used $3,700 of it to buy food for Feeding America, and used $1,300 toward R’Garden.

Swipes for the Homeless’ effort to make a difference in our community is a great example of Seizing Our Destiny’s unified city pillar. Riversiders are working together everyday to not only address local issues, but to also have a positive impact on the region, nation, and world.

For more information on Swipes for the Homeless, visit the UCR chapter page.

CBU Honors Record 1,420 Graduates During Spring Commencement

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in CBU News & Events on May 2, 2015)

commencement photo.jpg
Photo Credit: CBU News & Events

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, president of California Baptist University, congratulated 1,420 graduating students during afternoon and evening commencement ceremonies at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario. Afternoon exercises included 717 traditional undergraduate degree candidates, while the evening ceremony honored 703 students, including all master’s degree candidates, as well as undergraduates from Online and Professional Studies programs.

Ellis noted that the class was part of a record enrollment for the 2014-2015 academic year, with 7,957 enrolled at CBU.

“They have contributed to the continuing growth of CBU’s campus culture as ‘a University Committed to the Great Commission’ during an exciting time of continuing growth and improvement,” Ellis said. “Each of these graduating students has arrived at this point because of a shared commitment to the challenging yet rewarding endeavor of higher education.”

California Baptist University is always expanding and improving in a remarkable fashion.  Representing Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar, CBU’s record number of graduates helps improve the local and global economy and improves our already outstanding quality of life.

Combined with students who graduated last December, the Class of 2015 totals 1,946 applications for graduation, the largest number for a single year in CBU history.

To read the full article, click here.

CBU’s School Of Business Receives Accreditation For 10 More Years

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in CBU News & Events on April 24, 2015.)

Photo Credit: CBU News & Events
Photo Credit: CBU News & Events

The Dr. Robert K. Jabs School of Business at California Baptist University received notification this week that it has been accredited for another 10 years.

The school has spent the past two years working on a self-study, documenting its adherence to six quality standards, said Dr. Steve Strombeck, interim dean and professor of marketing. The standards are set by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) for its member universities to maintain. The standards are Leadership, Strategic Planning, Student and Stakeholder Focus, Measurement and Analysis of Student Learning and Performance, Faculty and Staff Focus, Educational and Business Process Management.

“It means that we are professionally accredited by one of the top business school accrediting bodies in the world,” Strombeck said.

ACBSP first accredited the school in 1995.

“We have maintained our national accreditation with ACBSP for the last 20 years” Strombeck said. “This is a significant thing.”

The School of Business offers a master of business administration degree, three bachelor degrees, three minors and has more than 560 students.

Accreditation is one of the top priorities when students are choosing a school to attend. CBU’s Business School accreditation makes not only the school of location of choice for students, but the entire city.

For the complete article, click here.

RCC College Drum Line Captures Sixth National Championship

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in the RCC Campus News on April 13, 2015.)

Photo Credit: Marchingbuzz
Photo Credit: Marchingbuzz

Riverside City College Marching Tigers’ Drum Line captured its sixth consecutive national championship this past weekend in Dayton, OH, scoring 98.563 points and setting a new world record for marching percussion ensemble.

Competing in the WGI Independent Marching World Division, RCC bettered Rhythm X from Columbus, OH and Pulse Percussion from Westminster, CA. The national championship competition concluded an undefeated 2015 season for the Tigers.

The 41-member team of percussionists presented an ecologically themed show titled Guardians of the Breath, which Gary Locke, director of the Marching Tigers, called “a kind of musical wake-up call,” a warning of the dangers of the human lifestyle habits killing off trees.

“It was an amazing, sophisticated (performance), yet accessible to spectators, fans and judges,” said Locke. “The production often moved at break-neck speed. The performance included the felling of futuristic-looking steel trees and ended on a hopeful note with the introduction of a new, young tree.”

RCC’s constant achievements help make the college and Riverside a location of choice for students seeking the best education for a reasonable price and a college that supports their passion.

For more information, log on to wgi.org or marchingbuzz.com

Final Result for Independent Marching World

1.) RCC (Riverside, CA) 98.563
2.) Rhythm X (Columbus, OH) 96.950
3.) Pulse Percussion (Westminster, CA) 96.838
4.) Music City Mystique (Nashville, TN) 96.063
5.) Infinity (Orlando, FL) 94.750
6.) Cadets Winter Percussion (Allentown, PA) 94.100
7.) Matrix (Akron, OH) 93.550
8.) STRYKE Percussion Ensemble (Palm Beach, FL) 92.125
9.) Cavaliers Indoor Percussion (Rosemont, IL) 91.413
10.) United Percussion (Camden County, NJ) 91.225​​

To read the complete article, click here.