Category Archives: Workforce

Not-So-Big Cities: Where Americans Are Moving

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Yuqing Pan and published in realtor.com on August 26, 2015.)

Photo Credit: realtor.com
Photo Credit: realtor.com

Among today’s urban migrants, Austin, TX, and Riverside, CA, hold more appeal than New York City and Los Angeles. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 18% of people who moved last year—that’s 8.5 million people—traded one metropolitan area for another, and a big chunk of them traded down for a smaller city not far away.

Los Angeles is still the top destination, with almost 245,000 people relocating from other metro areas, followed by New York City and Washington, DC. However, these big cities are also losing residents—more then they’re gaining. Almost 400,000 people quit The Big Apple last year, and 340,000 fled Los Angeles. (Note that this Census report looked only at people moving between metropolitan areas, and so didn’t count people moving between cities and small towns.)

Smaller cities such as Austin and Riverside—and not-so-small Houston—are gaining prosperity, with more people moving in than out.

A separate Census Bureau study showed that 10% of U.S. residents are dissatisfied with their current housing, neighborhood, local safety, or public services to the point that they want to move.

Riverside has increasingly become the ‘location of choice‘ for people and organizations escaping the hectic lifestyle of big cities.

By the numbers: Top 10 urban migration paths

1. Los Angeles, CA → Riverside, CA: 90,494
2. Riverside, CA → Los Angeles, CA: 54,711
3. New York, NYPhiladelphia, PA: 26,957
4. San Jose, CA → San Francisco, CA: 24,536
5. Washington, DC → Baltimore, MD: 22,944
6. New York, NY → Miami, FL: 22,226
7. Baltimore, MD → Washington, DC: 21,457
8. San Diego, CA → Riverside, CA: 19,667
9. Philadelphia, PA → New York, NY: 19,336
10. San Francisco, CA → San Jose, CA: 18,680

For the complete article, click here.

CBU’s Construction Management Program Receives Highest National Accreditation

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in CBU News & Events on July 29, 2015.)

Photo Credit: CBU News & Events
Photo Credit: CBU News & Events

CBU’s Bachelor of Science Construction Management (CM) program has achieved accreditation through the American Council of Construction Education (ACCE). ACCE is the leading accreditation body for CM programs in the nation.

“The ACCE accreditation adds tremendous benefit to the Southern California construction industry at large in the development and training of accredited future industry graduates,” said Dr. Francois Jacobs, department chair and associate professor of CBU’s CM program.

Ryan Kahrs, a 2014 CM graduate, credits the “practical and hands-on experience” of the program with helping him secure a job locally. The internship he started with Tilden-Coil Constructors eventually turned into a full-time position after graduation.

Graduating students obtain several certificates as part of their degree requirements including LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), OSHA 30 Hour (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and DBIA Fundamental Certificate (Design Build Institute of America). The CM program also requires all students to do an internship totaling 200 hours before graduating.

The construction management program began in 2012 with eight students. The enrollment for the upcoming fall semester is projected to exceed 40, with an additional 10 students enrolled in a minor in CM, Jacobs said.

Jacobs believes the ACCE accreditation will attract more students to the program including students from CM related community college programs where they can transfer their associate degree credits into a bachelor degree in CM at CBU. This accreditation  helps make CBU and Riverside a ‘location of choice‘ for students from across the globe.

To read the full article, click here.

La Sierra & UCR Ranked In The Top 10 Colleges That Add The Most Value

(This article contains excerpts from The 50 Colleges That Add the Most Value List that was published by Money Magazine.)

Photo Credit: Money Magazine
Photo Credit: Money Magazine
Photo Credit: Money Magazine
Photo Credit: Money Magazine

It’s not surprising that elite schools report high graduation rates, or that their alumni move on to high-paying jobs. Their high-achieving (and often well-to-do) students arrive with the talent and resources to thrive. What’s impressive is when a college can help students do far better than you’d expect based on their academic and economic backgrounds and the mix of majors at their schools. To compile this list, Money Magazine ranked colleges based solely on value-added grades for graduation rates, earnings, and student loan repayment, eliminating schools with a negative grade in any of those areas or a graduation rate below 50%.

On this list Money Magazine ranked La Sierra 8th and UCR 11th  in the nation on a list of 50 universities and colleges lauded by the magazine for adding the most value to students’ education.

The Money Magazine list of 50 colleges that add the most value can be accessed at this link: https://best-colleges.time.com/money/more-rankings/the-50-colleges-that-add-the-most-value#/list 

This ranking helps La Sierra, UCR, and Riverside become ‘location of choice for students seeking a great education at an affordable price.

CBU’s Department Of Aviation Science Signs Agreement With Ameriflight

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in CBU News & Events on July 14, 2015.)

Photo Credit: CBU News & Events
Photo Credit: CBU News & Events

California Baptist University recently signed an agreement with Ameriflight LLC, that will provide additional career opportunities for aviation flight graduates.

Students who meet a list of requirements will be guaranteed an interview with Ameriflight, a regional cargo carrier based in Dallas, Texas. The requirements include completing CBU curriculum and flight training, maintaining a 3.0 cumulative GPA and attaining a position as a certified flight instructor.

Ameriflight-final-map.jpg“This agreement is another vote of industry confidence for our department of aviation science,” said Dr. Daniel Prather, chair of the department of aviation science. “Ameriflight is a well-paying regional airline with a great need for pilots.”

CBU Aviation Science program already has a similar partnership agreements with SkyWest Airlines and Express Jet Airlines.

A recent article by AINonline indicates that Ameriflight raised its pay rates by 20 percent last November, and another increase took effect recently. A senior Embraer EMB-120 captain now makes $89,000 per year and a Piper Chieftain pilot $43,000 (up from $28,000).

The company’s website describes Ameriflight as a fleet cargo service, with more than 2,000 weekly departures and 90,000 flight hours annually. The agreement also includes an opportunity for CBU graduates to land a guaranteed interview with Allegiant Airlines after three years as an Ameriflight captain.

The CBU Department of Aviation Science opened in fall 2013 with 25 students and has grown to almost 60 students currently enrolled. The program has 11 flight training aircraft and an operations center with a flight simulator. This program also operates the CBU Flight School, which provides flight training for anyone who has an interest in learning how to fly at university-level standards.

CBU’s efforts and commitment to education certainly illustrate the Seizing Our Destiny pillar of intelligent growth.  For students, one of the greatest challenges they meet is finding a career path after graduation.  Providing students with the opportunity of future employment while they are completing their training at Cal Baptist holds great value to aviation science students.   This is just one example of how Cal Baptist University promotes intelligent growth by collaborating to build a stronger community for future Riversiders.

Riverside Wants To House All Homeless Veterans

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Alicia Robinson and Published in The Press Enterprise on July 19, 2015.)

Photo Credit: Stan Lim, The Press Enterprise
Photo Credit: Stan Lim, The Press Enterprise

The Riverside apartment David Oakley shares with his girlfriend and their gray cat, Mittens, is a modest one-bedroom with a cramped kitchen, donated furniture and a few framed prints on its off-white walls.

But it’s home, and Oakley is grateful for it.

Before he moved into the apartment seven months ago, Oakley, a 51-year-old National Guard veteran, was homeless for about two years.

Having his own place is “like it used to be, it’s the way it should be,” he said, then added, “It’s kind of, to be honest, like a dream come true.”

Oakley is one of several military veterans helped by an ambitious Riverside program that aims to house all of the city’s homeless veterans by the end of this year.

So far, the program, backed by Mayor William “Rusty” Bailey, has found homes for 11 veterans. It has 21 more veterans linked with caseworkers to help them apply for benefits and find jobs and apartments.

“It’s inexcusable in my mind to have homeless veterans,” said Bailey, a West Point graduate and Army veteran. “(With) 200,000 veterans in the two-county (Inland) region, we need to lead by example and to take care of our troops.”

The Riverside apartment David Oakley shares with his girlfriend and their gray cat, Mittens, is a modest one-bedroom with a cramped kitchen, donated furniture and a few framed prints on its off-white walls.

But it’s home, and Oakley is grateful for it.

Before he moved into the apartment seven months ago, Oakley, a 51-year-old National Guard veteran, was homeless for about two years.

Having his own place is “like it used to be, it’s the way it should be,” he said, then added, “It’s kind of, to be honest, like a dream come true.”

Oakley is one of several military veterans helped by an ambitious Riverside program that aims to house all of the city’s homeless veterans by the end of this year.

So far, the program, backed by Mayor William “Rusty” Bailey, has found homes for 11 veterans. It has 21 more veterans linked with caseworkers to help them apply for benefits and find jobs and apartments.

“It’s inexcusable in my mind to have homeless veterans,” said Bailey, a West Point graduate and Army veteran. “(With) 200,000 veterans in the two-county (Inland) region, we need to lead by example and to take care of our troops.”

House Veterans
Riverside is taking part in a federal program that challenges cities to find housing for all homeless military veterans by the end of 2015.

Participants: A total of 709 city, county and state officials have accepted the challenge. Other California cities involved include San Francisco, San Diego, Sacramento and Fresno.

Progress: In Riverside, housing has been found for 11 veterans, but 44 more still need homes.

Resources: Veterans and their advocates can call the Access Center, 951-715-3434, or visit endhomeless.info. Lighthouse, 951-571-3533, and the Department of Veterans Affairs in Loma Linda, 909-825-7084, also assist homeless veterans.

Riversiders commitment to making one-other’s life a little better is a great example of Riverside acting as a unified city. The actions of all the participating organizations demonstrates that Riverside is a caring community that has compassion for all of its inhabitants, and engages with one another for a better life for all.

To read the full article, click here.

CBU Flight School Now Has FAA Testing Center

(This article contains excerpts from the article posted in CBU News & Events on July 9, 2015)

Photo Credit: CBU
Photo Credit: CBU

California Baptist University’s Department of Aviation Science recently reached another milestone. The CBU Flight School now has an approved FAA Airman Knowledge Testing Center located in the Flight Operations Center.

The onsite testing center allows students to take their FAA exam in an environment they are familiar with and is convenient for them, said Dr. Daniel Prather, chair of the department of aviation science, which had its inaugural class in the fall of 2013. Previously, CBU aviation science students had to use an off-site testing center. Aviation flight majors typically take one test each semester to earn their rating or certificate in various areas, such as instrument rating or flight engineer.

“Having the testing center in-house just helps us provide the total package,” Prather said. “Students can come into the program, learn how to fly, earn their ratings and certificates, take their FAA written exams and earn their college degree.”

The test center is available to anyone wanting to take FAA-required knowledge exams, not just CBU students. The Flight School has 11 aircraft, six flight instructors with more being hired and now a test center.

“It’s yet another piece of the puzzle that allows us to continue growing and realizing our vision,” Prather said.

Testing centers like this are great examples of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar. CBU is dedicated to educating the next generation of students and helping them succeed. These testing centers play a vital role in strengthening our community’s workforce and job growth.

UCR Admits Many First Generation Students

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Bo Kovitz and published in The Press Enterprise on July 2, 2015.)

University of California, Riverside
University of California, Riverside

According to preliminary UC admissions data released Thursday, July 2, 49 percent of new admissions to UCR were first-generation students, compared to 42 percent systemwide.

UCR admitted 19,237 California residents, which had one of the highest rates of resident admissions systemwide, second only to UC Merced.

UCR spokeswoman Kris Lovekin praised the incoming class.

“We know they will be talented and diverse,” she said in a statement. “We serve large numbers of first generation, low-income students — we are at the forefront of America’s race to regain its educational edge and increase economic opportunity and mobility.”

The UC system admitted 92,324 freshmen and 20,921 community college transfer students. UCR admitted 21,582 freshmen, and 5,500 community college transfer students.

UCR admitted 63 percent of community college transfer students who applied, the highest percentage of the nine UC campuses.

About 45 percent of UCR’s new admissions are Asian-American and 32 percent are Latino. UCR admitted 516 more Asian-American freshmen, 377 more Latino freshmen, 75 more African-Americans and 60 more white students than in 2014.

About 42 percent of freshman applicants admitted to UC Riverside were from low-income families, compared to 36 percent across the UC system. UCR’s rate was the second highest, behind UC Merced.

UCR has always been a great example of Seizing Our Destiny’s unified city pillar. They strive everyday to offer opportunities for people of all cultures, backgrounds, and interests to receive a great education at a great price.

UCR Medical School Achieves Second Step In Accreditation Process

(This article contains excerpts from the article written Kathy Barton and published in UCR Today on June 26, 2015.)

UCR’s School of Medicine Education Building. Photo Credit: Ross French, UCR Today

The School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside has been granted provisional accreditation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for educational programs leading to the M.D. degree in the U.S. and Canada.

Provisional accreditation is the second of three steps that all new M.D.-granting medical schools must complete, culminating in full accreditation. The UCR medical school was granted preliminary accreditation by the LCME in October 2012, which permitted it to recruit and enroll its first class of 50 students in August 2013. This coming August, the UCR medical school will enroll its third class of medical students.

“This is tremendous news, not only for the School of Medicine and UCR, but for the entire Inland Southern California community which is served by this medical school,” said UCR Chancellor Kim A. Wilcox. “It is a credit to hard work of both the leadership of the School and the community that we have reached this milestone.”

“Achieving provisional accreditation is a major objective for the UCR School of Medicine,” said G. Richard Olds, UCR vice chancellor for health affairs and dean of the medical school. “Meeting the rigorous educational and infrastructure standards of the LCME demonstrates that this medical school has built a strong foundation for expanding and diversifying the physician workforce in Inland Southern California and improving the health of people living here.”

A survey team appointed by the LCME conducted a site visit of the UCR medical school in February, and the school was notified of the LCME decision this month.

The UCR School of Medicine, one of more than 15 new medical schools established in the U.S. over the last decade, is the sixth medical school in the University of California system. Establishment of the UCR School of Medicine was approved by the University of California Board of Regents in July 2008 and Olds, the founding dean, was appointed in February 2010.

The foundation of the UCR School of Medicine is the UCR/UCLA Thomas Haider Program in Biomedical Sciences, which for more than 30 years has partnered with the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA to train physicians. The UCR medical school maintains the tradition of the former two-year program at UCR, with about half of the seats each year designated for UCR undergraduate degree holders through the Thomas Haider Program at the UCR School of Medicine.

“Achieving this second important step in the accreditation process is a testament to the dedication of the faculty and staff of the medical school in creating an optimal learning environment for our medical students,” said Paul Lyons, the school’s senior associate dean for education. LCME evaluation of the medical school for full accreditation status will be expected in 2017, the same year the UCR medical school will graduate its first class of medical students.

The medical school also offers a Ph.D. program in biomedical sciences, a long-standing graduate degree program at UCR.  The school additionally operates five residency training programs in the medical specialties of family medicine, internal medicine, general surgery and psychiatry, and partners with Loma Linda University in a primary care pediatrics residency training program.

Accreditation is one of the top priorities when students are choosing a school to attend. UCR School of Medicine provisional accreditation makes not only the school of location of choice for students, but the entire city.

CBU Again Receives National Ranking For Online Programs For Veterans

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in CBU News & Events on June 2, 2015.)

Yeager Center-001.jpg
Photo Credit: CBU News & Events

California Baptist University’s online programs have earned the No. 20 spot in the 2015 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs for Veterans rankings by U.S. News & World Report. CBU was also ranked in the top 100 nationwide for their Online Graduate Education and Online MBA Programs for Veterans.

“I’m delighted that once again we have been ranked by U.S. News as a Best Online Programs for Veterans,” said Dr. David Poole, vice president for Online and Professional Studies at CBU.  “Online courses offer our service men and women the flexibility and convenience to complete their college education, regardless of where they may be stationed or live. This national ranking is a strong testament to the University’s continued commitment to our nation’s veterans and active military personnel.”

CBU entered the online education market in the spring of 2010 with programs offered by the university’s Division of Online and Professional Studies.  Also named by G.I. Jobs magazine as a 2015 Military Friendly School, CBU Online offers 21 bachelor degree programs with 30 major concentrations, and 14 master degree programs. Degree and course offerings are accessible fully online or in a hybrid format (virtual and synchronous) at educational service centers near some of California’s largest military bases.

To help veterans choose affordable, accessible and reputable distance education, U.S. News has launched its annual rankings of the Best Online Programs for Veterans, according to its website. All of the ranked programs belong to institutions that are certified for the G.I. Bill and participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program, two federal initiatives that help veterans reduce the cost of school.

Representing Seizing Our Destiny’s location of choice pillar, CBU attracts students and veterans from across the country due to their great reputation and their outstanding scholastic achievements.

For more information about the rankings, please visit the U.S. News 2015 Best Online Programs for Veterans at http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/bachelors/veteran-rankings.

UC Riverside Accepted As Yellow Ribbon Campus

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Mojgan Sherkat and published in UCR Today on May 28, 2015.)

UCR students and veterans join Chancellor Kim Wilcox as he signs the Yellow Ribbon agreements. Photo Credit: UCR Today
UCR students and veterans join Chancellor Kim Wilcox as he signs the Yellow Ribbon agreements. Photo Credit: UCR Today

The University of California, Riverside has been accepted as a Yellow Ribbon institution by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The program is designed to help students avoid up to 100 percent of their out-of-pocket tuition and fees associated with educational programs.

How does it work? The Post-9/11 GI Bill pays 100 percent of in-state tuition and fees for fully-eligible veterans attending public colleges and universities. But, non-resident supplemental tuition is not covered. Veterans and their families who have residency in other states are then forced to pay those fees out of their own pocket, at least until they have established residency.

Chryssa Jones, the veteran’s services coordinator at UCR says military families tend to be more transient than others, and many veterans have found themselves excluded by residency policies.

Last fall Congress attempted to fix this issue by passing Public Law 113-146: The Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 explained Jones. The law essentially required public institutions to allow all eligible veterans to attend academic institutions at in-state rates. But, still she said, some students were excluded by the eligibility rules under this law, particularly the children of active-duty military service members who are stationed outside of California.

DSC_0533-356x236
Chancellor Kim Wilcox jokes with UCR veteran students as he signs the Yellow Ribbon paperwork. Photo Credit: UCR Today

UCR decided to fill in the gap for these students by signing up to participate in the VA’s Yellow Ribbon Program, which is a supplement to the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Charles Kim, a veteran and senior at UCR said this is a monumental step forward for veterans and active duty service members.

“This program benefits those who serve but cannot claim California Residency due to their service. California has many major military installations and draws service members from all over the country but they could not attend our prestigious university without taking student loans,” Kim explained.

The Yellow Ribbon Program allows institutions and the VA to share the cost of nonresident tuition for students who qualify and are not already covered under the new law. As a result, all fully-eligible veterans, and their dependents, will have their tuition and fees fully covered by the VA and Yellow Ribbon.

Other UC campuses have participated in Yellow Ribbon in the past, but only for specific colleges or majors, and with a limit on funding.  UCR has decided to cover all students in all majors, with no limit. “With the signing of the new yellow ribbon program UCR can attract the best and brightest from our military,” said Kim. Participating in Yellow Ribbon helps make UCR and Riverside a location of choice for veterans by providing a great education at a great price.