Riverside Art Market Set For April 26th

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Marylin Jacobsen, published in the Press-Enterprise on April 3, 2014.)

Inland artists and crafts makers will display and sell their wares in front of the Riverside Main Library on April 26 at the new Riverside Art Market.  The free event is set for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Children will be able to try their hands at arts and crafts projects during the same hours.

Arts and crafts activities will be offered for children at the Riverside Art Market, set for April 26. Claire Stepien, 6, and her sister Olivia, 4, practice for the event. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

Arts and crafts activities will be offered for children at the Riverside Art Market, set for April 26. Claire Stepien, 6, and her sister Olivia, 4, practice for the event. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

Riverside Art Market is a new project of the Art Alliance of Riverside Art Museum to provide a venue for artists to show and sell their work and to raise money for the Riverside Art Museum. Watercolor and oil paintings, ceramics, graphic art, photography, weavings, jewelry, wood working and other forms of art will be found among the booths.

Among those who will have booths are Judy Davies Design, Marty Tobias, Helen Bell, Jan Lewis, Robert Collignon, Connie’s Creations, Sketches and Oils by C. Acid, Connie Lynn Pico, Lori Beilby, Joan Coffey, Zaza Faure Los Angeles, Mrs. Miller’s Hand Made Originals  (Annette Miller), Vis a Vis Jewelry, Ann Richmond and Michael Elderman.

Riverside artist Marty Tobias will show his paintings and etchings at a booth at Riverside Art Market on April 26 in front of the Riverside Main Library. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

Riverside artist Marty Tobias will show his paintings and etchings at a booth at Riverside Art Market on April 26 in front of the Riverside Main Library. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

An Art and Architecture Scavenger Hunt activity for $5 a person will be held three times in the day, with prizes awarded to the top five finishers from each start time. Start times are 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. in front of the Main Library. The walkable hunt will be a fun but challenging trip through downtown Riverside. Children, with adult supervision, are welcome .

A drawing will be held for a two-night stay and spa treatments at the Lavender Inn in Ojai. Tickets are available at the Museum, 3425 Mission Inn Ave., or by contacting Christine Cahraman of the Art Alliance at ramartsale@att.net.

The Riverside Art Market is a shining example of what makes Riverside a location of choice.  Events like this attract creative, entrepreneurial, dynamic and diverse people as residents, workers, business owners and visitors.  Riverside is one of the most inspiring, livable, healthy and adventurous cities to live in or visit. Our community provides an abundance of opportunities to be amazed, inspired and entertained.

Several food vendors will be at the Art Market, including Goodwin’s Organic food truck, Duke’s Wrap Delight, The Sweet Stop and Robert’s Tacos.

Booths for artists are available.

To read the full article, click here.

Eastside Apartments Set For Long-Awaited Overhaul

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Alicia Robinson, published in the Press-Enterprise on March 27, 2014.)

Built in the mid-1960s, the Grand Prix apartments on Seventh Street in Riverside’s Eastside neighborhood have clearly seen better days.

Shonda Herold, housing project coordinator with the city of Riverside, inspects a hole in the ceiling of one of three city-owned apartment buildings on Seventh Street on Wednesday, March 26, 2014. The city plans to replace the old buildings with new affordable housing units. Photo Credit: David Bauman

Shonda Herold, housing project coordinator with the city of Riverside, inspects a hole in the ceiling of one of three city-owned apartment buildings on Seventh Street on Wednesday, March 26, 2014. The city plans to replace the old buildings with new affordable housing units. Photo Credit: David Bauman

The seafoam-green paint is peeling from the wood trim on the boxy, flat-roofed building, and the kidney-shaped pool was long ago filled with dirt that has sprouted weeds. Now vacant and boarded up, the complex is weeks from being demolished, the first big step in a city plan to improve the neighborhood officials call Chicago/Linden because it’s near that intersection.

W_CHICAGO_0330_C_dwb

Photo Credit: David Bauman

Within two years, the Grand Prix and two other apartment buildings on the block will be replaced by an affordable housing complex that will have something for the community – a public garden, children’s play area or a child care facility. It’s part of an estimated $16.8 million strategy to make the area safer and more attractive for those who live there.

Fixing up the area, which lies between Chicago and Dwight avenues and West Linden and Seventh streets, has been a priority for city officials since 2006, housing project coordinator Shonda Herold said.

The overall strategy, created by a consultant with community input, includes installing new landscaping and more streetlights, improving driveways and alleys, reopening two cul-de-sacs that have become places for loitering, and building a community center at Patterson Park that could offer library programs, a commercial kitchen for public use, and activities for youths and seniors.

Photo Credit: David Bauman

Photo Credit: David Bauman

Officials expect the process of building community support and involvement to take time, just as finding money and fixing buildings will. Councilman Andy Melendrez, who represents the area, said he’s heard mostly positive feedback and excitement about plans for the neighborhood. He said he knows making the plans a reality is “not anything that’s going to happen from one year to the next.”

Transforming old spaces into new places throughout the city is what makes Riverside a location of choice.  With the mission to improve quality of life in Riverside, our community takes pride on maintaining it’s well defined, welcoming neighborhoods.

To read the full article, click here.

 

Riverside Maker of Aerospace Component Soars in New Directions

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Laurie Lucas published in the Press Enterprise on March 07, 2014)

STAN LIM/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER  Henri Rahmon, left, and Iggy Araujo are owners of Accuturn Corporation, a Riverside-based company that makes parts as small as a grain of sand for the aerospace, military, medical, dental and other industries.

STAN LIM/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Henri Rahmon, left, and Iggy Araujo are owners of Accuturn Corporation, a Riverside-based company that makes parts as small as a grain of sand for the aerospace, military, medical, dental and other industries.

Accuturn Corporation is a manufacturer of precision components, such as screws and washers, for aerospace, medical, dental, computer and other industries. At the controls since 2006, Iggy Araujo, 59, Henri Rahmon, 47 and a silent partner, have doubled annual sales, branched into the medical, automotive, computer, defense and dental industries and added state-of-the-art machinery that can make screws as small as a grain of sand or as fine as a strand of hair. These miniscule components, manufactured from stainless steel, titanium, gold and other materials, wind up in everything from cameras, tooth implants, orthopedic devices, drone antennas and Boeing cockpit panels to Caterpillar joysticks.

STAN LIM/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER   Parts much smaller than a penny manufactured at Accuturn.

STAN LIM/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Parts much smaller than a penny manufactured at Accuturn.

Business has taken off since the two immigrants bought a Riverside manufacturer of aerospace parts. In fact, like other successful innovation focused businesses in the city of Riverside; Accuturn has outgrown its location at 6510 Box Springs Road and is poised to expand its markets in Europe, South America and Canada. Rahmon said they’re pacing themselves, but expect to keep growing in strong, overseas markets. “We have a good name, low production costs and a quick turnaround,” he said. “And we have Iggy. He IS Accuturn.”

Riverside is a location of choice for people and organizations from all over the world; attracting a dynamic and diverse people as its residents and business owners. To read the full article click here.

Artist Spotlight: Stacee Tweedlie

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Patrick Brien published in the Press Enterprise on March 10, 2014)

                                                                                                                                                                                            /CONTRIBUTED IMAGE Stacee Tweedlie, seen here in December 2013, teaches musical theatre classes through the City of Riverside Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department at the Orange Terrace Community Center.

/CONTRIBUTED IMAGE
Stacee Tweedlie, seen here in December 2013, teaches musical theatre classes through the City of Riverside Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department at the Orange Terrace Community Center.

Stacee Tweedlie remembers the specific moment when a teacher’s love for musical theatre opened her eyes to a whole new set of possibilities. That is the moment she decided to become a teacher. “I knew right then I wanted to be that person for someone,” she says with a smile. “I wanted to share my love of theatre with kids and help them see that it’s more than just singing, dancing and acting. Theatre is teamwork, social skills, life lessons and, most importantly, fun.”

While still pursuing her BA in Theatre Education at Cal State Fullerton, Tweedlie began teaching private singing lessons and working at various children’s theatres in Orange County. After graduating and moving back to Riverside, where she had grown up, Tweedlie established her own studio, the Tweedlie Center for the Arts. She also began teaching musical theatre classes through the City of Riverside Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department at the Orange Terrace Community Center.

 /CONTRIBUTED IMAGE   This April 2013 production of "Aristocats" was held at the Orange Terrace Community Center in Riverside where Stacee Tweedlie teaches musical theatre classes.

/CONTRIBUTED IMAGE
This April 2013 production of “Aristocats” was held at the Orange Terrace Community Center in Riverside where Stacee Tweedlie teaches musical theatre classes.

Tweedlie talks about how her dream is not for her students to end up on Broadway. She says “I just want theatre and the arts to make a positive impact in their lives,” she says. “Whether they do one show with me or every single one until they leave for college, I hope that each student’s time spent in my classroom helps them become a better, more well-rounded and well-spoken, independent individual. Anything beyond that is a bonus.” Tweedlie, is also a performer with an extensive list of credits that includes such companies as Candlelight Pavilion, Downey Civic Light Opera and Huntington Beach Playhouse, believes that it is important to continue performing in order to remain relevant for her students. Shows in which she has appeared include “Seussical” (Gertrude), “The Full Monty” (Susan) and “Company” (Marta). She is also currently stage managing the Gestalt Theatre Project production of Neil LaBute’s “The Shape of Things,” which opens in April at The Box in downtown Riverside.I love working with kids, but there is something amazing about watching experienced actors in their element, especially in such a cool place as The Box,” says Tweedlie. “Not to mention I am quite a fan of Neil LaBute and the play, itself.”

It is individuals like Tweedlie who are demonstrating their love of theatre and arts, which reflects in her passion for community involvement. She says, “I’d also like to become more involved with the city of Riverside”. “I am falling in love all over again with this town. Our downtown area is becoming even more magical with the new convention center, The Box and all the great new restaurants, plus the Mission Inn. I want to help make sure that continues.” For more information on Stacee Tweedlie or the Tweedlie Center for the Arts, visit www.TCARiverside.com. To read the full article click here.

Wells Fargo UrbanLIFT Community Grant Program Awards $486,000 to Strengthen Neighborhoods

(This article contains excerpts from a Wells Fargo News Release dated March 7, 2014)

On March 7, 2014 Wells Fargo, announced its award for $458,600 to Habitat for Humanity Riverside (HFHR) and the Neighborhood Partnership Housing Services (NPHS) as part of the UrbanLIFT Community Grant Program with each organization receiving $229,300. Wells Fargo Grant

With the grant funds received, HFHR and NPHS will support neighborhood revitalization efforts that will include: NHFR’s Neighborhood Revitalizations Initiative helping to engage the community, creating holistic improvements and neighborhood cohesiveness, and further filling its mutual goal of creating safe, decent affordable housing.

NPHS will use grant dollars awarded to install solar panels on homes in Riverside County and to remove several dilapidated properties paving way for the construction of seven new affordable homes. These revitalization efforts fall under NPHS’ Sustainable Communities Catalyst Project, a multi-pronged redevelopment strategy which guides and prioritizes resources to targeted neighborhood clusters throughout the Inland Valley.

The UrbanLIFT community grant program is funded by Wells Fargo and operated by NeighborWorks America. The program is designed to provide support to local nonprofits for neighborhood revitalization projects in 25 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) with diverse populations that are impacted by foreclosures. Since its launch in February 2012, LIFT initiatives which is the parent for programs such as UrbanLIFT including the NeighborhoodLIFT and CityLIFT have helped create more than 5,000 homeowners with the support of down payment assistance and homebuyer education in collaboration with NeighborWorks America, members of the national nonprofit’s network and local city officials.

This is an example of a unified city and of people being brought together around common interests and concerns. Riverside is a caring community that has compassion for all its inhabitants, and engages with one another for a better life for all. To read the full news release by Wells Fargo click here, or visit their blog at blog.wellsfargo.com for more information.

Mission Inn Ranked In Conde Nast Traveler Magazine

(This article contains excerpts from from an article by Richard K. De Atley, published in the Press-Enterprise on February 28th, 2014.)

The Mission Inn Hotel & Spa in Riverside has scored three times recently with Conde Nast Traveler magazine.  In the publication’s 2013 Readers’ Choice Awards, with nearly 80,000 taking part in the survey, the historic inn made the Top 25 list in the highly competitive best hotel list for Southern California.

Kimber Licitra, a receptionist, stands in Kelly's Spa at the Mission Inn on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014. The Mission Inn Hotel & Spa scores with Conde Nast Traveler magazine's reader poll: No. 25 in the Top 25 list of best hotels in Southern California; No. 10 in the top 50 best spas in the world, according to the November 2013 issue.  Photo Credit: Kurt Miller

Kimber Licitra, a receptionist, stands in Kelly’s Spa at the Mission Inn on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014. The Mission Inn Hotel & Spa scores with Conde Nast Traveler magazine’s reader poll: No. 25 in the Top 25 list of best hotels in Southern California; No. 10 in the top 50 best spas in the world, according to the November 2013 issue. Photo Credit: Kurt Miller

 

It’s in the company of Beverly Hills’ The Peninsula (No. 1) and L’Ermitage (No. 7) ; Los Angeles’ Hotel Bel-Air (No. 3); Sunset Marquis Hotel & Villas (No. 22) ; and San Diego’s Tower 23 Hotel, which missed matching its name by coming in at No. 24 . The Mission Inn Hotel & Spa was No. 25.  A separate survey for Top 50 Hotel Spas in the United States has Kelly’s Spa at the Mission Inn rated No. 10. The Readers’ Choice Awards were announced in November.

The magazine more recently recommended The Mission Inn Hotel & Spa as a romantic vacation proposal destination, where suitors can arrange for a walk along the inn’s rotunda staircase that winds up at a small table with candles, champagne and roses for popping the question as flowers rain down.  All of the outstanding rankings, and vast selection of sites and activities at the historic Mission Inn, make this destination a true location of choice.  In the heart of Riverside, The Mission Inn Hotel & Spa is an elegant place where anyone can go relax and have a good time.

The inn’s largest draw has been the annual Festival of Lights, a Thanksgiving week-through-New Year’s celebration. The 21st edition featured 4 million lights decorating the inn along with holiday-motif characters on its balconies. An estimated 50,000 people attended the fireworks opening, and the festival attracted shoulder-to-shoulder crowds during its run.

Duane Roberts, co-owner and CEO, also moved to add restaurants to the inn’s standing lineup of the Mission Inn Restaurant and the Presidential Lounge. Duane’s Prime Steaks and Seafood just earned its 18th consecutive AAA four-diamond rating, which Roberts believes is unmatched.

The inn “is not a chain operation, so we are able to do special things, and we are able to do things the way we want to,” Duane Roberts said.

To read the full article, click here.

University Of California, Riverside Ranked #148 In The World

(This article contains excerpts from The World University Rankings 2013-2014)

The University of California, Riverside is among the top 150 universities in the world as reported by the publication, Times Higher Education World University Rankings, and it is doing nothing but improving.  UCR is an outstanding example of intelligent growth in the community and achieved this ranking with dedication and commitment from students, faculty, and staff.

UC Riverside sprouted from a spell of contemplating the navel, the orange variety first cultivated there in 1873. In 1907, it brought forth the US Citrus Experiment Station. That grew into today’s 1,200-acre campus, which researched biological pest control and now holds extensive collections on citrus diversity, science fiction and photography. Some 550 faculty teach around 19,300 students.

The rankings have become one of the key annual events in the international higher education calendar and these global university league tables are recognized as the world’s most authoritative source of broad comparative performance information on universities.

University of California Riverside Ranking: 148

ucr graph

The Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2013-2014 powered by Thomson Reuters are the only global university performance tables to judge world class universities across all of their core missions – teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook. The top universities rankings employ 13 carefully calibrated performance indicators to provide the most comprehensive and balanced comparisons available, which are trusted by students, academics, university leaders, industry and governments.

To read more about the ranking, click here.

Remodeled Convention Center Brings High Hopes

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Alicia Robinson, published in The Press-Enterprise on February 14th, 2014)

Riverside’s renovated convention center hasn’t yet opened but is already eliciting the “wows” city leaders hoped for in 2012 when they ponied up an extra $4.6 million dollars for a more attractive design.  A large scale renovation of the Riverside convention center has been long overdue, and on March 1st, 2014 the new convention center is scheduled to open it’s doors.  Loaded with state of the art technology and high end capabilities, the convention center will become a choice for new markets such as biomedical and pharmaceutical conventions, financial services events and corporate meetings. We will have the opportunity to showcase the City as a location of choice to many new visitors.

Now it sports a custom chandelier hanging in the 66-foot-high glass entry tower, a 40 percent larger exhibit hall, building-wide Wi-Fi and hundreds of smart phone charging stations, giving city and tourism officials hope that the center has everything a 21st century convention needs.

Photo credit: Kurt Miller/ staff photographer

Photo credit: Kurt Miller/ Staff Photographer

Riverside officials had been planning for nearly a decade to update the convention center, which opened in 1976 and had its last major touch-up in the late 1990s.  “It was a little worn before,” said Councilman Mike Gardner, who represents downtown.

Officials have said they got complaints about inadequate restrooms and a lack of “breakout rooms” for smaller sessions, and the center didn’t meet current earthquake standards. It also had a boxy, nearly windowless, dated design that didn’t command attention.

The redesigned center has a larger exhibit hall, two ballrooms, more small meeting rooms, a modern kitchen, a glass-walled entry tower, and the first escalator in a Riverside city building. Officials with the city and Raincross Hospitality Corp. said the furnishings – cherry wood paneling and a variety of carpet patterns in brown, beige and colonial blue – are meant to evoke a boutique hotel.

Photo Credit: Kurt Miller/ Staff Photograpgher

Photo Credit: Kurt Miller/ Staff Photographer

Riverside officials are banking on the kind of results Palm Springs has seen, after a $34 million upgrade completed in 2005.  Business has come back stronger than ever after dipping in 2008 and 2009 due to the recession, said James Canfield, executive director of the Palm Springs Convention Center and the city’s bureau of tourism.

Riverside Convention Center officials expect the upgrade puts them in a better position to compete with convention centers in Ontario and Pasadena and the Pechanga Resort & Casino near Temecula. They also say it enables them to go after a higher caliber of events.

To read the full article, click here.