Fair Housing Council Of Riverside County Honors Community Leaders And “Champions On The Rise”

(This article contains excerpts from rusdlink.org and an article published on the Press-Enterprise, by Dana Straehley.)

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This year’s honorees (from left to right): Habitat for Humanities Executive Director Karen Roberts, California Baptist University President Ronald L. Ellis, Riverside Community College District Trustee Janet Green, Civil Right Activist Lilian Harper, Latino Network President Ofelia Valdez-Yeager, Superior Court Judge Sunshine Suzanne Sykes, and Banning Mayor Debbie Franklin

The Riverside County Fair Housing Council honored seven community leaders, activists and volunteers at its 12th annual Champions for Justice awards banquet Thursday, April 3.

North High School’s International Baccalaureate Diploma program and students were also recognized by the Fair Housing Council of Riverside County, Inc. as “Champions on the Rise” at the council’s April 3 Champions of Justice banquet. Champions on the Rise are defined as students under 18 on a path to give back to the community and better themselves. The Council has recognized both of our city’s IB programs (North and Norte Vista) because of contributions the IB program and IB students have made to the community.

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Central to the IB Diploma program is Creativity, Action, and Service (CAS). The CAS requirement is a fundamental part of the program and takes seriously the importance of life outside the world of scholarship, providing a refreshing counterbalance to academic studies. Students are expected to be involved in CAS activities each week during the two years of the Diploma program and are encouraged to reflect on their CAS activities on a regular basis.

The Riverside CountyFair Housing Council represents seizing our destiny’s intelligent growth within our community.  It offers community leaders and students the opportunity to develop outstanding qualities that will prepare them for future endeavors while improving quality of life.

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UCR Professor Receives Young Scientist Honor

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Sean Nealon, published in UCR Today on April 9, 2014.)

David Kisailus, an associate professor of chemical engineering, is named a Kavli Fellow by members of National Academy of Sciences

David Kisailus, the Winston Chung Endowed Chair of Energy Innovation at the University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering, has been named aKavli Fellow.  Kavli Fellows are young scientists selected by the advisory board of the Kavli Foundation, members of the National Academy of Sciences and organizers of the Kavli/National Academy of Sciences Frontiers in Science Symposia series. The Kavli Foundation, which is based in Oxnard, supports scientific research, honors scientific achievement, and promotes public understanding of scientists and their work.

 David Kisailus, the Winston Chung Endowed Chair of Energy Innovation at the University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering, has been named a Kavli Fellow. Kavli Fellows are young scientists selected by the advisory board of the Kavli Foundation, members of the National Academy of Sciences and organizers of the Kavli/National Academy of Sciences Frontiers in Science Symposia series. The Kavli Foundation, which is based in Oxnard, supports scientific research, honors scientific achievement, and promotes public understanding of scientists and their work.  Photo Credit: Carlos Puma

David Kisailus, an associate professor of chemical engineering, Riverside, in his lab. Photo Credit: Carlos Puma

Kisailus, an associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering who is also part of the Materials Science and Engineering Program, works in a field called biomimetics.  He studies a number of structures of various invertebrates, primarily marine animals, and replicates that structure on a smaller scale to create lighter, stronger and more durable materials. He has worked with animals including the mantis shrimp, abalone and gumboot chiton to improve everything from solar cells and lithium-ion batteries to aircraft and vehicle frames to body armor and football helmets.

Kisailus presented his work, “From Nature to Engineering: Biomimetic and Bio-inspired Materials,” at the 19th German-American Kavli Frontiers in Science Symposium on April 4th at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Science and Engineering in Irvine.

The German-American Frontiers of Science, under the auspices of the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, has become a major instrument in bringing together the best young researchers in the natural sciences and engineering fields from the United States and around the world.

University of California, Riverside promotes intelligent growth through it’s commitment and dedication to providing an outstanding education to their students.   Riverside is working everyday to embrace ‘intelligent growth’ within all facets of the community.

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Riverside Art Market Set For April 26th

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Marylin Jacobsen, published in the Press-Enterprise on April 3, 2014.)

Inland artists and crafts makers will display and sell their wares in front of the Riverside Main Library on April 26 at the new Riverside Art Market.  The free event is set for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Children will be able to try their hands at arts and crafts projects during the same hours.

Arts and crafts activities will be offered for children at the Riverside Art Market, set for April 26. Claire Stepien, 6, and her sister Olivia, 4, practice for the event. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

Arts and crafts activities will be offered for children at the Riverside Art Market, set for April 26. Claire Stepien, 6, and her sister Olivia, 4, practice for the event. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

Riverside Art Market is a new project of the Art Alliance of Riverside Art Museum to provide a venue for artists to show and sell their work and to raise money for the Riverside Art Museum. Watercolor and oil paintings, ceramics, graphic art, photography, weavings, jewelry, wood working and other forms of art will be found among the booths.

Among those who will have booths are Judy Davies Design, Marty Tobias, Helen Bell, Jan Lewis, Robert Collignon, Connie’s Creations, Sketches and Oils by C. Acid, Connie Lynn Pico, Lori Beilby, Joan Coffey, Zaza Faure Los Angeles, Mrs. Miller’s Hand Made Originals  (Annette Miller), Vis a Vis Jewelry, Ann Richmond and Michael Elderman.

Riverside artist Marty Tobias will show his paintings and etchings at a booth at Riverside Art Market on April 26 in front of the Riverside Main Library. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

Riverside artist Marty Tobias will show his paintings and etchings at a booth at Riverside Art Market on April 26 in front of the Riverside Main Library. Photo Credit: Riverside Art Market

An Art and Architecture Scavenger Hunt activity for $5 a person will be held three times in the day, with prizes awarded to the top five finishers from each start time. Start times are 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. in front of the Main Library. The walkable hunt will be a fun but challenging trip through downtown Riverside. Children, with adult supervision, are welcome .

A drawing will be held for a two-night stay and spa treatments at the Lavender Inn in Ojai. Tickets are available at the Museum, 3425 Mission Inn Ave., or by contacting Christine Cahraman of the Art Alliance at ramartsale@att.net.

The Riverside Art Market is a shining example of what makes Riverside a location of choice.  Events like this attract creative, entrepreneurial, dynamic and diverse people as residents, workers, business owners and visitors.  Riverside is one of the most inspiring, livable, healthy and adventurous cities to live in or visit. Our community provides an abundance of opportunities to be amazed, inspired and entertained.

Several food vendors will be at the Art Market, including Goodwin’s Organic food truck, Duke’s Wrap Delight, The Sweet Stop and Robert’s Tacos.

Booths for artists are available.

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La Sierra Library Holds Largest Public Book Sale In It’s History

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Darla Martin Tucker, published on lasierra.edu on March 31, 2014.)

Kitty Simmons, library director at La Sierra University recently walked among stacks and boxes of books filling the library’s receiving room, pointing out volumes of history, literature, plays, religious works, children’s books and many other topics.  “There’s something for everyone,” she said. And with the cornucopia of books slated for public sale totaling around 3,000, she may be right. On Mon., March 31 at 8 a.m. the library kicked off its annual spring quarter book sale with this year’s event shaping up to be the largest in the library’s history.

Kitty Simmons, La Sierra University library director stands among roughly 3,000 books she plans to sell during the library’s annual sale beginning March 31.

Kitty Simmons, La Sierra University library director stands among roughly 3,000 books she plans to sell during the library’s annual sale beginning March 31.

The sale is being held in the library’s Lincoln Room and will continue through June 8. Opening sale book prices range from $3 for hardcovers to $1 for paperbacks, CDs and other media items, with pocket books selling for 25 cents.

The library sells books that are donated by community members and by university faculty and staff, as well as older library books and books that need to be discarded due to duplication or publishing of newer editions. This year’s sale is larger than usual in part because of book donations from faculty members who moved into new offices as the university expanded with the construction of the Tom and Vi Zapara School of Business and the renovation of several buildings.

Proceeds from the annual book sales help pay for special library projects such as art pieces for the walls, patio furniture, an atrium fountain and other items. “This year we bought a new sofa for the library from this fund,” Simmons said.

Simmons sends unsold books from the library’s sales to BetterWorldBooks.com which supports worldwide literacy programs. She is already taking in books for next year’s sale event and is planning ways to sell this year’s large haul over the quarter. “Every year the books offered are from ‘fresh’ stock,” she said.

Kitty Simmons and the library at La Sierra University exemplify intelligent growth by holding this massive book sale for the community.  Anyone who is hungry for knowledge is sure to fulfill their appetite with a such a vast selection of genres and types of books that are available.  Not only are the books being sold at very affordable rates, all the proceeds are being invested straight back into the library making the environment better the students.  Through dedication and commitment to education, La Sierra University values improving the learning experience for their students making this institution a model for intelligent growth.

Book sale shoppers will take home their purchases in eco-friendly bags provided by the library. The book sale is open during library operating hours of 8 a.m. – 12 a.m. Mon. – Thurs., 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. Fri., and 1 p.m. – 12 a.m. Sun. For further information call 951-785-2515 or 951-785-2044. La Sierra University is located at 4500 Riverwalk Parkway. The library is located off of Middle Campus Drive.

To read the full article, click here.

UC Riverside Hosts Lecture On Hydraulic Fracturing Technology

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Iqbal Pittalwala, published in UCRToday on April 1, 2014.)

Fracking, the hydraulic fracturing technology by which shale rocks are fractured by a pressurized liquid to release oil and natural gas, is controversial with proponents citing an increase in domestic oil production and lower gas prices, and opponents voicing environmental concerns and worries over small tremors that have sometimes followed fracking.

An illustration of hydraulic fracturing and related activities. Photo Credit: US Environmental Protection Agency

An illustration of hydraulic fracturing and related activities.
Photo Credit: US Environmental Protection Agency

On Wednesday, April 9, Susan L. Brantley, a distinguished professor of geosciences at Pennsylvania State University, will give a free public lecture at the University of California, Riverside in which she will discuss fracking’s impact on water.

“In Pennsylvania, shale gas is accessed at depths of thousands of feet while drinking water is extracted from depths of only hundreds of feet. Nowhere in the state have fracking compounds injected at depth been shown to contaminate drinking water,” Brantley and a colleague wrote last year in an opinion piece in the New York Times.  Brantley is the director of Penn State’s Earth and Environmental Systems Institute. She joined the university in 1986, and was named distinguished professor in 2008. She was educated at Princeton University, receiving her B.A. magna cum laude in chemistry in 1980, an M.A. in geological and geophysical sciences in 1983, and a Ph.D. in the same field in 1987.

Susan L. Brantley is a distinguished professor of geosciences at Pennsylvania State University. Photo Credit: Pennsylvania State University

Susan L. Brantley is a distinguished professor of geosciences at Pennsylvania State University. Photo Credit: Pennsylvania State University

UC Riverside’s involvement and role in raising awareness of the potential dangers of fracking represents intelligent growth in our community.  The use of fracking has become a highly controversial subject over the past couple of years.  Although the issue isn’t taking place in our beloved city, it is a concern that the whole nation is debating.  UC Riverside is promoting intelligent growth beyond their borders to improve quality of life throughout the nation, to ensure a safe environment for the future.

To read the full article, click here.

 

CBU Aviation Science Program Enters Agreement With ExpressJet Airlines

(This article contains excerpts from an article posted on Calbaptist.edu on March 24, 2014.)

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California Baptist University’s aviation science program has entered into a Pilot Pathway Interview Agreement with ExpressJet Airlines.  The agreement, which is the first to be initiated by CBU, guarantees qualified students an interview and preferential consideration for pilot hiring with ExpressJet, which operates contractually as United Express, Delta Connection and American Eagle.

Photo Credit: expressjet.com

Photo Credit: expressjet.com

“In addition to benefiting current students, this agreement is a significant student recruiting tool,” said Dr. Daniel Prather, chair of the department of aviation science. “Students can now see real benefit in attending CBU and majoring in aviation flight.”

The agreement is designed to provide opportunities for future employment at the airline for pilots completing training at CBU and meeting airline qualifications, including the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Airplane Multiengine Land and Instrument Airplane ratings, a CFI certificate, First Class Medical Certificate, background checks and letters of recommendation from CBU’s department of aviation science.

CBU’s efforts and commitment to education certainly illustrate the seizing our destiny pillar of intelligent growth.  For students, one of the greatest challenges they meet is finding a career path after graduation.  Providing students with the opportunity of future employment while they are completing their training at Cal Baptist holds great value to aviation science students.   This is just one example of how Cal Baptist University promotes intelligent growth by collaborating to build a stronger community for future Riversiders.

To read the full article, click here.

Mock Trial: Riverside’s Poly High Takes Third Place At State

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Bradley Locke, published in the Press-Enterprise on March 23, 2014.)

In early March Seizing Our Destiny posted an article highlighting Riverside’s Poly High mock trial team for placing first in the county competition, and the team just placed 3rd in the state mock trial competition on Sunday March 23, 2014.

Riverside Polytechnic High School’s mock trial team celebrates after winning third place at the state competition in San Jose on Sunday, March 23.Photo credit: Pamela Ferre

Riverside Polytechnic High School’s mock trial team celebrates after winning third place at the state competition in San Jose on Sunday, March 23.Photo credit: Pamela Ferre

For three years in a row, Riverside Polytechnic High School’s Mock Trial team made it to the state competition, but couldn’t get past the quarterfinal round.  But the fourth year was a charm, as they took 3rd place in San Jose this weekend.

The competition began Friday evening and lasted until Saturday when the two finalists were announced. Awards were presented Sunday afternoon. Poly came in behind San Mateo County and Ventura County. Also competing from the Inland area was Redlands High School.  This was Poly’s 15th time at the state competition. The school won the state title in 1992, 1996 and 2003.

Poly adviser Matt Schiller said he is nothing but proud of the team. “Everyone lived up to their potential,” he said.  The team did not start “picking up steam” until the county competition in early March, he said. That was when he realized they could make it to state this year and go further than the quarterfinals.

As the competition drew closer, practice hours reached 10 to 15 hours a week. With the help of Schiller and three other coaches, the 27 team members practiced by holding practice scrimmages and other exercises.  Now that the competition is over, the team is looking forward to some time off. Schiller laughed that he and the other coaches are looking forward to seeing their wives again, too.

The mock trial team at Riverside’s Poly High exemplifies intelligent growth in our community.  They keep moving forward and have worked hard to preserve the campus’ competitive reputation.  Through dedication and commitment to education, the team at Poly Tech High is constantly improving with no signs of slowing.

To read the full article, click here.

King High Students Hear Veterans’ Experiences

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Dayna Straehley, published in the Press-Enterprise on March 21, 2014.)

U.S. veterans participate at King High Remembers. High school juniors interviewed 298 veterans and learned history from them Friday March 21. The crowd overflowed from the school gym into the multipurpose room and some classrooms.

U.S. Army Korean War veteran Charles Geitner, 85, an Illinois native now living in Fullerton, shares his experiences with Riverside King High School juniors Darrel Artiaga and Nicole Item. The school's 11th graders interviewed 298 veterans during King High Remembers on Friday March 21.  Photo Credit: Milka Soko

U.S. Army Korean War veteran Charles Geitner, 85, an Illinois native now living in Fullerton, shares his experiences with Riverside King High School juniors Darrel Artiaga and Nicole Item. The school’s 11th graders interviewed 298 veterans during King High Remembers on Friday March 21. Photo Credit: Milka Soko

The veterans were interviewed across tables in the school gym, multipurpose room and in classrooms by groups of two or three 11th graders, who asked about their war experiences, military life, homecoming, their opinion of their time in the service and current conflicts.

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When Sgt. Bert Frank got home from World War II after three years in the Army, he took off his uniform and threw it on the floor.  He didn’t put it back on until Friday, March 21, when he wore it to King High School in Riverside.  Frank, a 90-year-old Los Angeles resident, was among 298 veterans interviewed by high school juniors in the 14th annual King High Remembers. One of those students was his grandson Joel Frank.

Like many veterans, Frank, brought a scrapbook that included some mementos of happy experiences. He was in the Army from 1942 to 1945.

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Frank told students about the dances they had almost every week while he was stationed in the Philippines and USO shows with Bob Hope, King Kaiser and others. The Army showed movies, but almost all of them were interrupted by bombers that sent soldiers running for their fox holes.

The King High Remembers event that took place on Friday that allowed students to interview veterans represented the seizing our destiny pillars intelligent growth, and unified city.  By interviewing the veterans directly in small groups like this gave the high school students a very valuable opportunity to learn about not only our country’s history, but also the heritage and background of local heroes.  Speaking to veterans from different branches of military from numerous wars, the knowledge instilled from the veterans certainly exemplified intelligent growth, by equipping the students with information and knowledge that can’t be taught in textbooks.

The experiences shared and interaction between two different generations was a great example of Riverside being a unified city.  The students were able to have intimate conversations with a melting pot of veterans.  Veterans from numerous military branches in attendance ranged in war involvement, age, ethnicity, and background.  The diversity of attendees enabled the students to hear a broad perspective of experiences, and to understand the commonality among all of the veterans.   They were given the opportunity to respect and value the cultural heritage, distinct needs and varied input of each of the veterans, while proactively engaging with them across generational gaps.

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WAR TALLY

Some veterans served in two or more wars or did not list a war. Not all of the 361 who were expected showed up. Others arrived without advance notice, making for a total of 298, social studies teachers said.

WWII: 59

KOREAN WAR: 57

VIETNAM WAR: 149

COLD WAR: 48

GULF WAR: 21

IRAQ/AFGHANISTAN WARS: 17

To read the full article, click here.

 

 

Champions Council Focuses On Promoting Mentorship Programs For 2014

The Seizing Our Destiny Champions Council convened in late February and brainstormed possible projects for the Champions in 2014.  While focusing on the intelligent growth pillar, a common message seemed to surround the subject of mentoring.

Champions Council

After brainstorming and discussing potential projects and developments, the groups agreed on the fact that allocating their efforts toward mentorship programs would be a great task.  One focus would be on mentoring for high school seniors.  College bound or not, individuals in this age group play a pivotal role in developing a strong future for Riverside, and we want to make sure that each student has all of the guidance and resources they need to secure their future.

Champions Council1

Champions Council2

There was also discussion of business/entrepreneurial mentoring.  The plan is to research all mentoring opportunities in Riverside and report back to the council in April.  The next step will be determining how the council will support existing mentoring programs, as well as identify areas where mentoring may be lacking.  The Seizing Our Destiny Champions Council is excited to see the impact of growing mentorship programs and awareness in Riverside and improving the resources available.

Although the council was focusing on the intelligent growth pillar of the seizing our destiny initiative, developing our mentorship resources really touches all four pillars; intelligent growth, catalyst for innovation, location of choice, and unified city.  The fact that the task at hand relates to all four of the pillars in different ways makes this a real win.

The mission of intelligent growth is built upon growing the economy, raising the standard of living and managing a growing population.  Developing strong mentorship opportunities in the community is one of many paths to raising the standard of living in our beloved city and managing a growing population.

For more information, contact Teresa Rosales, Seizing Our Destiny Coordinator, at trosales@riversideca.gov

Bighorn Sheep Went Extinct On Desert Island In Gulf Of California, Study Finds

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Iqbal Pittalwalla, published in UCRToday on March 19, 2014.)

Until discovery by UC Riverside-led team, bighorn sheep were not known to have inhabited Tiburón Island – changing a conservation paradigm.

Using ancient DNA analysis and other techniques, a research team led by conservation biologists at the University of California, Riverside has determined that bighorn sheep, so named for their massive spiral horns, became extinct on Tiburón Island, a large and mostly uninhabited island just off Sonora, Mexico, in the Gulf of California, sometime in the last millennium — specifically between the 6th and 19th centuries.

Photo shows a bighorn sheep skull from Tiburón Island.  Photo Credit: Benjamin Wilder

Photo shows a bighorn sheep skull from Tiburón Island. Photo Credit: Benjamin Wilder

The research got its start when in the spring of 2012 Wilder, along with a lab mate and his Seri collaborators, made an incidental discovery of a 1500-1600-year-old, urine-cemented dung mat on the floor of a small cave in the Sierra Kunkaak, a rugged mountain range of the eastern side of Tiburón Island.

The discovery raises fascinating questions: How should the reintroduction of bighorn sheep on Tiburón Island be regarded? Is it a restoration or a biological invasion?

Benjamin Wilder noting specifics of the bighorn sheep deposit on Tiburón Island. Photo Credit: Andrew Semotiuk

Benjamin Wilder noting specifics of the bighorn sheep deposit on Tiburón Island.
Photo Credit: Andrew Semotiuk

The latter question also applies to most cases of rewilding and de-extinction efforts. Julio Betancourt, a USGS paleoecologist and co-author on the study, thinks that, in the future, “molecular caving, the application of molecular genetics to cave sediments, will become more than an afterthought to answer such questions in aridland paleoecology and conservation.”

Wilder, Betancourt, and Mead were joined in the study by Clinton W. Epps and Rachel S. Crowhurst at Oregon State University; and Exequiel Ezcurra at UCR. Wilder works in Ezcurra’s lab.

This research exploration led by a team of scientists from UC Riverside is a great demonstration of intelligent growth.  The strong work ethic and dedication of our well respected scientists at UCR is what leads to new discoveries and makes strides in preservation and conservation.

To read the full article, click here.