Category Archives: Intelligent Growth

Inland Education Collaborative Awarded $5 Million

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Jeanette Marantos and published in UCR Today on March 20, 2015.)

Pamela Clute, special assistant to the chancellor at UC Riverside. Photo Credit: UCR Today
Pamela Clute, special assistant to the chancellor at UC Riverside. Photo Credit: UCR Today

The Federation for a Competitive Economy (FACE), a regional collaborative vision that began at UC Riverside, has earned a $5 million Governor’s Award for Innovation in Higher Education. It was selected as one of the top plans of the 57 submitted from around the state to improve college graduation rates in California, a committee of the California Department of Finance announced today.

Awards like the Governor’s Award for Innovation in Higher Education are great examples of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar by not only embracing the universities and schools, but the entire Riverside economy.

The Governor’s Award proposal, prepared by California State University, San Bernardino in partnership with UC Riverside, multiple Inland Empire community colleges, school districts, governments, businesses, the Inland Empire Economic Partnership and the Coachella Valley Economic Partnership, is fairly straightforward:

FACE and its subcommittees are tackling the problem from two sides: make sure inland high school students are ready for college when they graduate, and increase the number of inland college students who actually earn a bachelor’s degree.

The Governor’s Award proposal, submitted by Cal State University San Bernardino President Tomás Morales and Rachel Weiss, CSUSB’s director of research of sponsored programs, sets specific benchmarks for meeting those goals by 2020:

  • Use FACE and its 175 members to align educational policy and initiatives between the two counties to both improve college outcomes and keep those college graduates here, working jobs in the Inland Empire
  • Reduce the number of college freshmen who need remediation classes by 20 percent by increasing college readiness at the high school level, particularly in math.
  • Increase the number of bachelor degrees earned at inland universities by 15 percent
  • Increase the number of students completing their bachelor’s degrees within six years by 10 percent
  • Strengthen partnerships with Inland Empire industries to better align education with workforce needs, such as creating more college internship opportunities to give students a chance to better understand what employers need, and help them develop business relationships while they’re in college.

Beefing up math instruction at the high school level is a key part of the proposal, because math is one of the biggest hurdles to college completion, said Pamela Clute, a Ph.D. math instructor, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) advocate and UC Riverside’s special assistant to the chancellor.

Clute developed the FACE collaborative in 2009, at the behest of then-Chancellor Timothy P. White, who has since gone on to become president of the California State University system. UCR Chancellor Kim A. Wilcox has continued UCR’s support for the project, and now co-chairs the FACE-IEEP Educational Council with Morales.

To read the full article, click here.

Sophomore Girls Learn The Power Of STEM With Inspire Her Mind Conference

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in the RUSD news feed on March 2, 2015.)

Photo Credit: RUSD
Photo Credit: RUSD

About 150 sophomore girls from across RUSD had the chance to explore possibilities available to them in the STEM fields through the Inspire Her Mind program. This unique program, held at Bourns Engineering, included a special presentation by Dr. Pamela Clute, a longtime mathematics professor who currently serves as special assistant to the chancellor at UC Riverside. The event also included a chance for girls to learn about the unique ways that science contributes to the world and see first-hand the ways that math and science impact the world around them – like how a green screen works in film. They also heard from a panel of women in science who encouraged them to try out these fields for themselves.

Riverside’s initiative to promote and encourage STEM education is a model of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.  STEM education plays a vital role in strengthening our community’s workforce and job growth.  Riverside works around the clock everyday to improve the quality of life for all through intelligent growth.

Health Foundation Announces Clinic Expansion

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in The Press Enterprise on February 11, 2015.)

Photo Credit: Riverside Community Health Foundation

The Riverside Community Health Foundation announced this week that it is planning a $3.5 million expansion of its Eastside Health Center that will nearly double the number of patients that can be seen, a news release said.

The clinic on University Avenue in Riverside sees about 6,500 patients per year and is at maximum capacity. The expansion will increase annual patient visits to over 12,000.

With a convenient location, dedicated medical and dental staff, and partnership with the community, Eastside Health Center has and continues to have a huge impact on the City of Riverside residents.

The Eastside Health Center  stands as a core anchor of quality and low cost medical and dental care for the underserved and uninsured throughout Riverside’s eastside neighborhoods. These eastside neighborhoods have in the past been plagued by high crime and poverty rates; however, they have been the focal point of the city’s recent efforts of improvement and renovation. The renovation is an example of Seizing Our Destiny’s unified city pillar.

The nonprofit foundation has purchased land directly across from the health clinic and plans to break ground on an expansion in late 2015, the news release said.

The foundation also provided more than $3 million in programs and grants in 2014 to organizations providing services to residents living in Riverside and Jurupa Valley.

Organizations that received funding included Loma Linda Children’s Hospital Foundation, Parkview Community Hospital, Riverside Community College District and the Jurupa Area Recreation and Park District.

The $3.5 million expansion of the Eastside Health Center is a great example of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar. Riverside embraces economic growth and directs it so it maintains and improves our already outstanding quality of life. This includes growing the economy, raising the standard of living and managing a growing population.

For the complete article, click here.

Riverside Ranks 103 For Economic Performance In The World

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in FoxBusiness on January 21, 2015.)

mall at night
Photo Credit: City of Riverside

The Brookings Institution and JPMorgan Chase ranked 300 major cities worldwide for economic performance last year. The City of Riverside placed 103 overall, 17 in the US, and 3rd in California.

Riverside embraces economic growth and directs it so it maintains and improves our already outstanding quality of life. This ranking is yet another example of Riverside continuing to fuel the intelligent growth of the city and region.

Rank Economic Performance 2013-2014 Country Metro/City Real GDP per Capita Growth 2013-2014 Employment Growth 2013-2014 Rank Economic Performance 2009-2014
103 USA Riverside 0.20% 2.80% 182

For the full list of rankings, click here.

First Doctoral Program At CBU Scheduled For Fall 2015 Launch

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Dr. Mark A Wyatt and published in CBU News & Events on January 15, 2015.)

Photo Credit: CBU
Photo Credit: CBU

California Baptist University will have its first doctoral degree beginning in the fall of 2015. The School of Nursing will offer the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) after it was approved by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

“It is very exciting to be launching CBU’s first doctoral program later this year,” said Dr. Jonathan Parker, CBU provost and vice president for academic affairs. “We have been working very diligently to develop a high quality DNP degree program and I’m especially pleased that our accrediting agency has recognized that effort and commented very favorably on the result.”

The school expects 20 students in its first class, said Dr. Lisa Bursch, acting director of the DNP program. Bursch said there is a national movement to have more nurses educated at a doctoral level because of the complexity of health care. For that reason, the school is looking to train nurse leaders to have an impact on health outcomes.

“For as much money as (the nation) spends on health care, our national outcomes are not that great,” Bursch said. “Something’s not translating between what we know to do and what’s being done.”

The nursing doctoral program will be the only one in Riverside County, Bursch said. Students in the clinical doctorate will take original research and put it into practice. Classes will include organization and systems leadership class, nursing theory and translational research, policy and finance. All students will do a project, which involves looking at health outcomes and how to improve them.

Parker said it is fitting that CBU’s first doctoral program is in nursing. “Programs such as the DNP not only help to meet an important need in society by producing highly-trained healthcare professionals,” he explained, “but they also represent the service-related values that California Baptist University seeks to instill in its graduates.”

Being the first and only nursing doctoral program in Riverside County, CBU’s effort to develop programs the meet the needs of employers is a great example of Seizing Our Destiny intelligent growth pillar.

For the complete article, click here.

Chemists Fabricate Novel Rewritable Paper

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Iqbal Pittalwala published in UCR Today on December 2, 2014)

Photo Credit: Yin Lab, UC Riverside
Photo Credit: Yin Lab, UC Riverside

Chemists at the University of California, Riverside have now fabricated rewritable paper in the lab, one that is based on the color switching property of commercial chemicals called redox dyes.  The dye forms the imaging layer of the paper.  Printing is achieved by using ultraviolet light to photobleach the dye, except the portions that constitute the text on the paper.  The new rewritable paper can be erased and written on more than 20 times with no significant loss in contrast or resolution.

“This rewritable paper does not require additional inks for printing, making it both economically and environmentally viable,” said Yadong Yin, a professor of chemistry, whose lab led the research. “It represents an attractive alternative to regular paper in meeting the increasing global needs for sustainability and environmental conservation.”

The rewritable paper is essentially rewritable media in the form of glass or plastic film to which letters and patterns can be repeatedly printed, retained for days, and then erased by simple heating.

The paper comes in three primary colors: blue, red and green, produced by using the commercial redox dyes methylene blue, neutral red and acid green, respectively.  Included in the dye are titania nanocrystals (these serve as catalysts) and the thickening agent hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC).  The combination of the dye, catalysts and HEC lends high reversibility and repeatability to the film.

Research like this is an example of Seizing Our Destiny’s catalyst for innovation pillar. The students and staff at UC Riverside cultivate and support ideas, research, and products that accelerate the common good for all.  Creativity and innovation permeate all that we do in Riveside, which makes our community a trendsetter for the region, state, and the world to follow.  

Study results appear online in Nature Communications.

For the complete article, click here.

UCR Business School Receives $2.5 Million Gift

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Sean Nealon, published in UCR Today on November 14, 2014.)

From left, UCR Assistant Vice Chancellor for Development Jeff Kaatz, UCR Chancellor Kim Wilcox, Gary Lastinger, Erin Lastinger, Samantha Anderson, Erik Anderson and UCR School of Business Administration Dean Yunzeng Wang. The Andersons and Lastingers are affiliated with the A. Gary Anderson Family Foundation. Photo Credit: UCR Today
From left, UCR Assistant Vice Chancellor for Development Jeff Kaatz, UCR Chancellor Kim Wilcox, Gary Lastinger, Erin Lastinger, Samantha Anderson, Erik Anderson and UCR School of Business Administration Dean Yunzeng Wang. The Andersons and Lastingers are affiliated with the A. Gary Anderson Family Foundation. Photo Credit: UCR Today

The A. Gary Anderson Family Foundation announced Thursday it is giving $2.5 million to the University of California, Riverside School of Business Administration to create three endowed chairs for faculty members and provide scholarships for graduate students from Inland Southern California.

The gift is the latest show of support from the A. Gary Anderson Family Foundation, and was announced at a gala Thursday (Nov. 13) at the Victoria Club in Riverside that celebrated the 20th anniversary of the naming of The A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management (AGSM). The foundation has made previous gifts exceeding $8 million.

Donations toward education are great examples of Seizing Our Destiny  intelligent growth pillar by not only embracing the growth of the business school, but the entire Riverside economy. 

The family foundation is also providing $1 million for AGSM Scholars Initiative, a scholarship program that will increase the enrollment of Inland Southern California students pursuing graduate degrees. Up to 85 percent of that money may be used as matching funds to attract new philanthropic support. That could mean an additional $850,000.

The remaining $150,000 will be used for outreach activities, such as the financial literacy component for area high school students attending UC Riverside’s annual economic forecast conference.

The gift will help the A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management meet its goal of being ranked among the top 50 business schools in the nation.

Leading up to 2020, the school plans to continue to increase graduate school enrollment, which has grown from 150 to 300 in just the past three years; increase the size and enhance the quality of its faculty; and launch research centers in areas including entrepreneurial leadership, economic forecasting and supply chain management and logistics.

To accommodate current and future growth, the School of Business Administration is beginning a feasibility study for a new building to house its programs.

For the full article, click here.

Business Incubator Opened in Riverside

(This article contains excerpts from an article written by Sean Nealon and published in UCR Today on November 6, 2014.)

Aaron Seitz, a psychology professor at UC Riverside, is one of the founders of Fundamental Brain Games and Services, LLC, which plans to move into the incubator. Photo Credit: UCR Today
Aaron Seitz, a psychology professor at UC Riverside, is one of the founders of Fundamental Brain Games and Services, LLC, which plans to move into the incubator. Photo Credit: UCR Today

A business incubator in downtown Riverside created by officials from the University of California, Riverside, City of Riverside and Riverside County and business leader had it’s grand opening the past Wednesday, November 12.

Four companies, three started by UC Riverside professors and one by an alumnus, have been approved for the Riverside ExCITE Incubator, located at 3499 10th Street. One of the companies has moved in and others plan to move in in the near future.

There is space for up to six companies and several others have expressed interest in moving in. The space is available to any start-up companies in the community, not just those connected to UC Riverside.

“It has been hard to create new companies based on technology developed at the university out of the university,” said Michael Pazzani, the vice chancellor for research and economic development at UC Riverside and one of the directors of the incubator. “This will make it easier. It will also encourage faculty to start new companies and commercialize the technology they develop.”

Pazzani, along with Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey and John Tavaglione, who represents Riverside on the county of Board of Supervisors, spoke at the grand opening.

The incubator is designed to facilitate the successful incubation and acceleration of start-up companies engaged in entrepreneurial research and development of advanced technologies. Incubators such as ExCITE are great examples of the Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.

The incubator aims to increase the number of successful start-up businesses in the region by providing a location for business synthesis, mentorship and management; access to financial resources and information; access to marketing and professional services; and technology transfer from domestic and foreign universities, organizations and governments.

For the full article, click here.

UC Riverside Celebrates Three Megawatts of Solar Power

(This article contains excerpts from an article written by Kris Lovekin and published in UCR Today on November 5, 2014.)

UCR has a solar farm that provides more than three megawatts, or the equivalent of 960 houses. Photo Credit: Ross French, UCR Today
UCR has a solar farm that provides more than three megawatts, or the equivalent of 960 houses. Photo Credit: Ross French, UCR Today

UC Riverside has opened a brand new solar farm that will produce up to 6.6 million megawatt hours of electricity each year. That is the equivalent of powering 960 homes for a year.

The ribbon cutting, at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, will include Chancellor Kim A. Wilcox, local government officials, student leaders, and representatives of SunPower Corporation. It will be held on the solar farm site, which is next to UCR’s Community Garden. Parking will be available in Lot 30.

The project supports the system-wide University Policy on Sustainable Practices, which calls on each campus to contribute to the production of up to 10 megawatts of on-site renewable power by 2014.  Wendell Brase, UC Irvine’s vice chancellor for administrative and business services, will attend the ribbon cutting. He is co-chair of UC President Janet Napolitano’s Global Climate Leadership Council.

UCR’s solar array is currently the largest solar array in the University of California system. Other campuses are also quickly adding more solar technology. For instance, UC Irvine opens a large system next year:

UCR signed a 20-year power purchase agreement that allowed the SunPower Corporation to construct, operate and maintain the facility, with the university purchasing the power. UCR spent $350,000 on site clearing and preparation, as well as interconnections costs with the existing substation. The projected savings to the university is $4.3 million over the length of the contract. UCR will also receive carbon and LEED credits that provide additional financial and environmental savings.

The solar farm went online as scheduled on Friday, Sept. 19. It has 7,440 panels across the 11-acre site using GPS tracking to slowly follow the sun across the sky. The massive sea of shiny panels is visible from Highway 60 as thousands of cars pass the campus.

“This is a big step forward, and we plan to do more,” said John Cook, director of the UCR’s Office of Sustainability. “On a hot and sunny day we will be producing nearly a third of UCR’s total energy needs with this system. But over the course of the year, with variable weather, it will amount to 3 percent of our total energy needs.” He said Riverside’s typical sunny climate will make UCR an especially efficient place to invest in solar technology. With the growing concern of climate change and pollution from fossil fuels, UCR is taking steps to reduce their foot print on the environment and promote the quality of life for all through intelligent growth of their campus.

For the full article, click here.

Riverside Ranks No. 6 Nationally in Job Growth

(This article contains excerpts from article written by Debra Gruszecki, published in The Press Enterprise on October 29, 2014)

mall at night

The Riverside metropolitan region has turned the corner when it comes to job growth, according to a report from Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business in Tempe.

The region ranked No. 6 in the nation for job recovery, ASU research professor Lee McPheters said. “We’re still slowly recovering from the staggering loss of jobs during the Great Recession,” McPheters said, as the metro region of Riverside, San Bernardino and Ontario once led the nation for foreclosure and bled thousands of jobs. The Riverside metro region of more than 1 million workers tied with Denver with 2.8 percent job growth over three quarters of 2014. The national economy is growing less than 2 percent, so any job growth that is better than 2 percent is above average, McPheters said.

“Eight of the top large cities for job creation are in the West,” McPheters said. “However, Florida also did well, with two cities on the list.” Orlando took the top spot with job growth of 3.7 percent, double the national pace. Houston ranked No. 2 with 3.5 percent job growth. Metro regions with stronger job growth than Riverside were Portland, Miami and Dallas. Other winners based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics were San Diego and San Francisco.

This ranking is yet another example of Riverside continuing to fuel the intelligent growth of the region.

For the complete article, click here.