UC Riverside Hosts ‘Boot Camp’ To Ease Native Americans’ Entry

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Krysta Fauria, published in the Press-Enterprise on July 23, 2014.)

Young college bound Native Americans are being encouraed to attend the “Boot Camp” opportunities at UC Riverside.  These exercises are an outstanding model of Riverside growing as a unified city.  Riversiders care for one another and ensure that everyone has access to a great education and the resources necessary to succeed.  We are a caring community that engages with one another for a better life for all. 

Native Americans take part in a drum circle before workshop sessions at UCR. Only 12 percent of Native Americans between 25 and 34 have four-year degrees, compared to 37 percent of whites, according to a 2012 report.  Photo credit: Chris Carlson

Native Americans take part in a drum circle before workshop sessions at UCR. Only 12 percent of Native Americans between 25 and 34 have four-year degrees, compared to 37 percent of whites, according to a 2012 report. Photo credit: Chris Carlson

Throughout their week at UCR, students got a taste of the college experience by attending classroom lectures, eating in the cafeteria and sleeping in the dorms. The 30 students also participated in cultural activities like prayer circles and beading workshops.  Upon completion of UCR’s program, students are given access to the university’s resources and staff to assist with the application process.

Elijah Watson knows he wants to go to college. He also knows it will be difficult to leave home on the Navajo reservation if he does.  The 17-year-old was reminded of the tough decision he’ll face next year when he participated in a week long celebration in March of his cousin’s Kinaalda, a hallowed Navajo ceremony marking a girl’s transition into womanhood.

Native Americans gather for a drum circle before workshop sessions at UC Riverside on Thursday, June 26.  Photo Credit: Chris Carlson

Native Americans gather for a drum circle before workshop sessions at UC Riverside on Thursday, June 26. Photo Credit: Chris Carlson

To reach students like Watson with higher education aspirations, a growing number of universities are offering programs to recruit and prepare Native American students for a transition to college life that can bring on a wrenching emotional conflict as they straddle two worlds.

Many young Native Americans find themselves divided by their desire for a higher education and the drive to stay close to home to hold onto a critical part of their identity. Sometimes, families discourage children from pursuing college, fearing once they leave the reservation, they won’t come back.

To read the full article, click here.

Riverside Unified School District Teachers Go On Arctic Expedition

(This article contains excerpts from rusdlink.org and the Arctic’s Edge Facebook page.)

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After collecting samples from four ponds along Lindy Trail this morning, the team “chills” on the tundra. Photo credit: Arctic’s Edge

Eight Riverside Unified School District teachers went on an Arctic Expedition this summer. With an Earthwatch fellowship made possible through the Riverside Educational Enrichment Foundation (REEF).

The adventurers include: Stephanie  Niechayev from Arlington High School; JulieOlson from Chemawa Middle school; Melinda Lang from Madison Elementary School; Erin Garcia from University Heights Middle School; Suzanne Priebe from Earhart Middle School; Tammy Soper from Sierra Middle School; Carla Yawney from Kennedy Elementary School; and Kristin Kund from Poly High School.

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Photo credit: Arctic’s Edge

The expedition team from RUSD exemplifies Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.  Not only were they able to gather valuable research and data, they are now able to share the findings with their students. This experience gives students the opportunity to take their eyes out of the books briefly and connect with teachers in a fun and interesting way.

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Photo credit: Arctic’s Edge

The teachers departed for their trip on July 9 and were gone through July 20. They travelled to Manitoba, Canada to measure evidence of global warming. The objective was to take water samples; assess the abundance of fish and frogs, and monitor the health of trees in the area. Teachers spent the mornings collecting data, worked in labs in the afternoons, and attended lectures in the evenings.

To read more, click here.

 

Riverside Teen Launches Fashion Collection

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Laurie Lucas, published in the Press-Enterprise on July 23, 2014.)

Kubrat Salaam, a 16- year old fashion designer, business owner, and entrepreneur from Riverside, is launching her new clothing line.  Called Kubitees, it combines African and American fashion styles to create unique pieces of apparel.

Help 16-year-old Riverside teen, Kubrat Salaam, launch her fashion line, a fusion of American and African styles. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Help 16-year-old Riverside teen, Kubrat Salaam, launch her fashion line, a fusion of American and African styles. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

To introduce her company she has designed a 15 -piece clothing collection called “The Bridge”.

Bursting with entrepreneurial spirit, Kubrat Salaam is a true testament to Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar. Her dedication, passion, and drive remind us all that creativity and talent can blossom at a young age. Our community values the talents and efforts of our next generation, as harnessing these individuals’ entrepreneurial spirit is one of the keys to a prosperous future in Riverside.

She has everything set, from designs to manufacturer.  Kubrat is using a  crowdfunding platform (Kickstarter) to raise this money.  The minimum pledge is one dollar, but there are rewards for pledges of $5 or  more and they increase to pledges of $500.

To read the full article, click here.

Business Workshops To Grow Your Business

(This article contains excerpts from iesmallbusiness.com)

The City of Riverside Office of Economic Development is hosting a Business Summer Series at City Hall in conjunction with the Inland Empire Small Business Small Business Development Center (IESBDC). The first workshop, Developing A Business Plan For Success, brought 35 attendees.

Business Workshop 2

Photo Credit: Paul Bush

Are you looking to increase your bottom line? Attend the upcoming workshop on Friday, July 25th and learn how an effective marketing plan can help you to increase your sales and profitability while efficiently managing your marketing dollar. This workshop will be presented by Vincent McCoy from IESBDC and will cover topics such as Marketing Research Basics, Defining Your Customer & Target Market, Analyzing Your Competition and Determining Market Mix. Be sure to go online to iesmallbusiness.com to pre-register, as seats are filling up!

The sponsored workshops hosted by the City of Riverside exemplify intelligent growth within our community.  Small business owners are given the opportunity to develop their business plans and become familiar with the different resources available to them.  All of the workshops will take place in the Mayor’s Ceremonial Room on the 7th floor at Riverside City Hall.  Be sure to pre-register at iesmallbusiness.com, as seats fill up quickly.

To sign up for the workshops, click here for details.

For the IESBDC calendar of events, click here.

Students Score Paid Summer Internships

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Kyle Glaser, published in the Press-Enterprise on July 14, 2014)

From teaching kids’ art classes to working with nonprofit groups, recent high school graduates are earning money and experience.

Some Inland teens have landed cool summer jobs – paid internships that also give them the chance to help their communities.  Riverside residents Saul Gonzalez and Roberto Gutierrez are working with Habitat for Humanity of Riverside, building homes, collecting donations and managing inventory. Riverside residents Margarita Oreta and Christina Chu are interning at the Riverside Art Museum, teaching art classes and helping create exhibitions.

Roberto Gutierrez, left, and Saul Gonzalez are interning Habitat for Humanity through a Bank of America program.  Photo credit: Kurt Miller

Roberto Gutierrez, left, and Saul Gonzalez are interning Habitat for Humanity through a Bank of America program. Photo credit: Kurt Miller

All four earned their internships as part of Bank of America’s Student Leaders Program, which puts recent high school graduates in eight-week paid internships at nonprofit organizations.  The internships go beyond the stereotypical teen summer internship of answering phones or getting coffee. Interns are assigned similar tasks as full-time professionals with the hope their experiences will help them through their college days and into their working years.

This a great representation of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.  In the past, high school students and graduates looked forward to the summer to sleep in and spend time with friends.  With the current job market becoming more and more competitive, students are starting to make more efforts toward developing their work experience and not just settling for a summer job at a fast food restaurant.  Riverside promotes an outstanding quality of life for all through intelligent growth.

While the students are getting pay and invaluable experience, they aren’t the only ones benefiting.

“The kids get a lot out of it and then, of course, we get a little bit of extra labor, which always helps,” Habitat for Humanity Executive Director Kathy Michalak said. “These kids bring a different twist. Both of us get something really great out of it, which is what makes this work.”

To read more, click here.

 

Entrepreneurs Team Up Under One Roof

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Laurie Lucas, published in the Press-Enterprise on July 13, 2014)

Three Inland Empire entrepreneurs with enough chops and hops to go pro have tapped into an unusual business model to keep their home drafts flowing.  Brad McCauley, 31, Jason Castonguay, 38, and Philip Vieira, 29, are exceptionally bright science and computer geeks with a thirst for creating innovative beers and ales. But they lack the big bucks for a startup.

Brad McCauley, 31, Jason Castonguay, 38, and Philip Vieira, 29, left to right, are three brewers sharing facilities in an “incubator” for home brewers provided by Brew Crew, who hold the lease in a Riverside building. Photo credit: Kurt Miller.

Brad McCauley, 31, Jason Castonguay, 38, and Philip Vieira, 29, left to right, are three brewers sharing facilities in an “incubator” for home brewers provided by Brew Crew, who hold the lease in a Riverside building. Photo credit: Kurt Miller.

The concept is to help nanobrewing neophytes shed their amateur status by allowing them to work in a collaborative space where they can share equipment, develop recipes in a commercial setting and test-market directly to the public.

It is interesting to see entrepreneurs collaborating to help build each others brands by sharing knowledge and equipment, the brewers at Brew Crew Inc exemplify Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.  Working everyday to harness entrepreneurial spirit within the community, Riverside embraces economic growth and directs it so it maintains and improves our already outstanding quality of life. 

Brew Crew, an 1,800-square-foot manufacturing and retail facility at Suite G, 11626 Sterling Ave., contains two brewing systems, a walk-in cooler to store kegs and a bar with 16 taps. There’s seating for 50, 25 in the store front and 25 in the warehouse when brewing isn’t happening.

The trio of brewers are contract laborers working under the umbrella of a single corporation, Brew Crew, which leases the building. Its co-founders, CEO McCauley and Vince Pileggi, chief business officer, scrambled for 18 months to obtain all of the licensing and permits before opening the brewery and tap room six weeks ago. Depending on drink sizes, prices run from $1.50 to $7. There’s no food served, but customers may bring their own.  “There are a lot of home brew clubs in this area that have amazing brewers,” Pileggi said. The goal is to provide the resources “to incubate” fledgling brewers who hope to eventually take wing on their own. “We’re finding the best talent we can and courting others who can benefit and grow,” he said.

To read more, click here.

 

Mother Of Six Graduates With Two AA Degrees

(This article contains excerpts from rcc.edu)

Pursuing higher education is never an easy feat, especially when the odds are against you.  It is remarkable to witness individuals rise above the adversity they are faced with and achieve college diplomas.  This resilience of the human spirit that enables some to overcome obstacles and persevere is a model of seizing our destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.  Riverside is working everyday to embrace intelligent growth within all facets of the community making our city a location of choice that attracts creative, entrepreneurial, dynamic and diverse people.  Here is just one remarkable success story from an Riverside City College graduate.

Bree Dennis, graduating with an associate of science degree in Early Childhood, para-professional studies and an associate of arts in Social and Behavioral Studies, along with several certificates. Photo Credit: rcc.edu

Bree Dennis, graduating with an associate of science degree in Early Childhood, para-professional studies and an associate of arts in Social and Behavioral Studies, along with several certificates. Photo Credit: rcc.edu

Bree Dennis grew up with the words “you are not good enough” engrained in her head.  However, she did not let the verbal abuse stop her from living her life and pursuing an education.  “I grew up with divorced parents and a sister.  My parents were often yelling and physically fighting with each other. I attended more than 20 different schools before high school,” said Dennis. “My mother and sister were in and out of mental hospitals and I was left to fend for myself.”
Dennis thought being a single mother of six would be enough to keep her busy, but that wasn’t the case. She still felt a void and enrolled at Riverside City College.  Today, she works at the RCC Career Technical Education Office, assisting with special projects and coordinating the job fair. Dennis also serves as an ASRCC Senator, president of the Pathways to Teaching Club, and was crowned the 2014 Homecoming Queen.
She was awarded seven scholarships this year and received the Women’s Opportunity Award from Soroptimist International of Riverside and the California Financial Aid Counselors Scholarship.  This semester alone she volunteered over 400 hours and was instrumental in working with the RCCD Foundation to bring food resources to the RCC Resource Center.  In the community, Dennis serves on the Council for the Riverside Childcare Consortium and is a volunteer coordinator for the Early Literacy Conference.
“Studying with six kids is difficult but when you add a job and volunteering on top of that, as well as a learning disability, it seems almost impossible,” she said. “I have learned to have faith in myself and my abilities. I am achieving a 3.297 GPA, something I never thought was possible. I thank God for my counselors, Marc and Anne, and the CalWORKs and EOPS/CARE offices every day for helping make my dreams a reality.”
Dennis will be graduating with an associate of science degree in Early Childhood, para-professional studies and an associate of arts in Social and Behavioral Studies, along with several certificates.  She will be transferring to Cambridge University in Rancho Cucamonga.  Her goal is to become a first grade teacher.
To read more, click here.

 

UCR Is Nurturing Undergraduates By Leading Them To Research

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Lilledeshan Bose, published in UCR Today on June 17, 2014.)

In the summer of 2010, My Hua, then a 19-year-old sophomore at UC Riverside, plunged into the sweltering heat and unrelenting humidity of Chennai, India.  She was there with Unite for Sight, a nonprofit that delivers eye care to impoverished villages around the world. Her experience led to a thirst to do more to address issues of human health.  

The Spring 2014 issue of UCR Magazine, photo credit: ucrtoday.ucr.edu

The Spring 2014 issue of UCR Magazine, photo credit: ucrtoday.ucr.edu

The answer? “It was research, unexpectedly,” she said.  Four years later she has published her work on the potential harm from e-cigarettes in peer-reviewed journals. Hua is one of the Chancellor’s Research Fellows profiled in the cover story of this Spring 2014 UCR magazine about undergraduate research.  Aided by campus-sponsored programs and valuable faculty mentorship, about 20 percent of all Highlanders are able to participate in research before they even receive a bachelor’s degree.

The research and writings generated by the Highlander students along the journey to their bachelor’s degrees exemplify seizing our destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.  UCR is nurturing undergraduates by leading them to research, via campus-sponsored programs and valuable faculty mentorship.  Riverside is always developing new paths and opportunities to promote an outstanding quality of life for all through intelligent growth.  

To read more, click here

 

La Sierra Celebrates Student Research

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Darla Martin Tucker, published in La Sierra News on June 10, 2014.)

Research Emphasis Week at La Sierra University has been a model of seizing our destiny’s intelligent growth pillar. Riverside is working everyday to embrace intelligent growth within all facets of the community.  May 27th-30th was a time of discovery and a celebration of accomplishment at La Sierra University as undergraduate and graduate students gave dissertation and research talks, by presenting posters on their various projects.

Students Andrew Akamine and Andrew Moreno discuss their research poster with Divinity School professor Doug Clark. (Photos by Natan Vigna)

Students Andrew Akamine and Andrew Moreno discuss their research poster with Divinity School professor Doug Clark. (Photos by Natan Vigna)

Research Emphasis Week involved presentations from students in La Sierra’s various disciplines, musical recitals, doctoral dissertation presentations as well as the annual student research poster session and awards ceremony.

Students lined the hallways of both floors of the Thaine B. Price Science Complex, standing in front of their posters which outlined hypotheses and outcomes of their various experiments and surveys in psychology, archaeology, biology, neuroscience, health and exercise science, education, chemistry and biochemistry.

Psychobiology major Natalie Espinoza researched eyewitness memory and how emotion affects susceptibility. She hypothesized that negative emotions can cause greater susceptibility to misinformation and less accuracy; however research outcomes showed little difference between the impact on accuracy of positive, neutral and negative emotions. Outcomes also showed that individuals were more susceptible to misinformation that is spoken rather than written. 

Psychology major Vanessa Haro discusses her research poster with La Sierra University President Randal Wisbey.

Psychology major Vanessa Haro discusses her research poster with La Sierra University President Randal Wisbey.

Winners of the Library Undergraduate Research Prize were also presented with their awards during Research Emphasis Week. The competition is open to all graduate students who work with librarians through the research process to submit award-winning papers.

To read more, click here

UCR Launches Largest Renewable Energy Project In California

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Aaron Grech, published in the Highlander News on June 3, 2014)

One of the most visible partners of the Bourns College of Engineering (BCOE) is the Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT), which has begun a project to create a renewable energy research center that will study the integration of renewable energy sources such as an electrical smart grid that can help with charging electric cars and storing energy. The project, called the Sustainable Integrated Grid Initiative, will be the largest of its kind in California.  The UCR Bourns College of Engineering is at the forefront of renewable energy research.  The students and faculty are committed to developing state of the art technology to harness renewable energy on a much larger scale.  Riverside is working everyday to embrace intelligent growth within all facets of the community.

Photo credit:  UCR Today

Photo credit: UCR Today

Most energy supplied through current grids operates on a one-way interaction that distributes electricity from the grid to other structures such as buildings and houses. This makes it difficult to keep up with changing energy demands, and does not run on as many renewable energy sources.

Smart grids, on the other hand, can integrate technologies such as wind turbines and solar panels to provide cleaner energy sources, and also create energy storage because of their unique feedback system. As a result, grids can easily adapt to changing demands and cut electricity costs through storing surplus energy. In addition, the grids can also be used to supply energy to electric vehicles through charging stations that are connected to them.

“The project has implications for the nation and the world,” stated BCOE Dean Dr. Reza Abbaschian. If successful, this research aims to develop cleaner and more efficient ways to produce electricity and may eventually lead to other similar projects in the U.S.  According to Dr. Matthew Barth, the lead investigator of the initiative and director of CE-CERT, “The project puts UC Riverside at the forefront of smart grid and electric vehicle research, providing a unique platform for engineers and utilities to identify and solve potential problems.”

Brandon Prell, a second-year cellular and molecular biology major, believes that research on renewable energy is needed, in order for “the planet to continue developing.” He said that a smart grid will bring a change to that by modernizing outdated methods that may cause even further harm to the environment.

To read the full article, click here.