Category Archives: Intelligent Growth

UC Riverside Students Training at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Sean Nealon and published in UCR Today on June 10, 2016.)

Photo Credit: UCR Today
Photo Credit: UCR Today

Ten University of California, Riverside students will have internships at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) this summer thanks to a $4.5 million grant the university received last year from NASA.

The grant will also allow 22 high school students from Riverside Unified School District to take a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) class at UC Riverside this summer.

The University of California, Riverside received the NASA grant to develop research, education, training and collaborative opportunities in big data and visualization.

The five-year research project, called “Fellowships and Internships in Extremely Large Data Sets” (FIELDS), will train underrepresented minority students in STEM fields to address a critical shortfall in the workforce essential for future NASA missions. Bahram Mobasher, a professor of physics and astronomy, is the grant’s principal investigator.

Students participating in the research project will be underrepresented minorities at all educational levels, with undergraduate students being selected from physical, biological, computer science and engineering disciplines at UC Riverside and partner institutions – all Hispanic-serving institutions such as UC Riverside – nationwide.

Each undergraduate intern will spend 10 weeks at JPL during summer for two years and receive a stipend of $6,000 each year. At the end of the summer, the UC Riverside students who continue their research at the campus under a UC Riverside faculty or JPL science staff will receive $3,000 during the academic year.

The 10 UC Riverside students selected are: Samantha Annamraju, Brandy Coats, Nelson Garcia, Jesse Mendoza, Jasmine Moreno, Sirina Nabhan, John Pham, Joshua Rubio, Sunaina Santhiveeran and Brittany Seto. There are also nine students from other colleges and universities participating.

“These internships are invaluable because they teach research skills and also teach the students how to leverage the opportunity for future career aspirations,” said Reynal Guillen, UC Riverside’s program manager for the FIELDS program.

The grant was made through the 2014 Education Opportunities in NASA Science, Technology, Engineering and Math NASA research announcement for the establishment of MUREP Institutional Research Opportunity (MIRO) centers. MIRO awards promote STEM literacy and enhance and sustain the capability of institutions to perform NASA-related research and education.

Grants like this are great examples of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar. UCR is dedicated to educating the next generation of students and helping them succeed. These programs play a vital role in strengthening our community’s workforce and job growth.

To read the full article, click here.

CBU To Offer Three New Marketing Concentrations

(This article contains excerpts from the article published in CBU News & Events on June 8, 2016.)

marketing-news-story-2016-june
Photo Credit: CBU News & Events

Students at California Baptist University will have more of an opportunity to distinguish themselves in the diverse marketing field starting this fall. CBU will offer three new concentrations for the bachelor’s of science in marketing (BSM) degree: sport marketing, international marketing and sales management.

“The goal of the new concentrations is to prepare students for a very specific career field,” said Dr. Natalie Winter, interim associate dean and associate professor at the Dr. Robert K. Jabs School of Business. “These options give students the opportunity to make a decision about their career path sooner than later.”

Winter said the marketing faculty had been collecting feedback for several years from alumni and students on its BSM program. The responses indicated a demand for more concentrated marketing programs.

The department responded by conducting research on the local job market trends to find appropriate concentrations to offer, she said.

Each concentration consists of 12 units of coursework related specifically to a field of study. Declaring a concentration allows students to focus on courses that are relevant to a desired career path. Additionally, the concentrations add an internship component that propels students to gain hands-on learning experiences.

“Internships are great opportunities for students to position themselves as experienced graduates and help them stand out for future employers,” Winter said. “One of the nice things about being located in the Inland Empire is that students can choose from a broad range of industries to gain this professional experience.”

Winter said students can still graduate in four years with a declared concentration, and they will also receive a general marketing background.

“I believe it will be a win-win situation for students and CBU,” she said.

CBU’s efforts and commitment to education certainly illustrate the Seizing Our Destiny pillar of intelligent growth. Offering these new concentrations will help students expanded their knowledge and become more valuable to employers.

Read more about courses for each concentration here.

To read the full article, click here.

UC Riverside Adds Data Science Specialization to Online MS in Engineering

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Sarah Nightingale and published in UCR Today on May 20, 2016.)

Photo Credit: Darpa
Photo Credit: Darpa

Knowledge is power, but in the age of ‘big data’ many companies are finding themselves with too much of a good thing. The smart ones hire data scientists—experts with the knowledge to analyze large datasets, visualize them, and find meaningful patterns that help businesses get ahead.

To meet the growing demand for data scientists, the University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering has added a new Data Science specialization to its Online Master of Science in Engineering, a fully online degree program that is aimed at professionals in multi-disciplinary data-driven fields (engineers, scientists, medical and social media professionals) looking to enhance their careers.

With topics spanning data mining, machine learning, statistical computing, and data visualization, graduates will be ready to help organizations take advantage of the enormous amounts of data generated today, providing new insights and improving decision-making capabilities. The program is jointly developed by UCR faculty and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) science staff.

“NASA is just one example of an organization that is relying more and more heavily on data scientists who can analyze and draw conclusions from the vast amount of information that can be collected today,” said Kambiz Vafai, a Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Online Master of Science in Engineering. “The specialization is also aimed at people who are working or planning to work in financial sectors, social media, retail and academic research.”

According to the career site Glassdoor.com, data scientists can initially earn annual salaries of $100,000 to $130,000, while data visualization specialists’ base earnings start around $80,000 and can reach $100,000.

“This is a highly coveted skillset that employers are looking for as they imagine the potential for big data to uncover new revenue streams and improve their business processes,” Vafai said.

Development of the Data Science specialization is supported by a NASA Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) ‘Fellowships and Internships in Extremely Large Data Sets (FIELDS)’ grant awarded to UCR in 2015. The MUREP program aims to increase the number of undergraduate and graduate students in NASA-related fields in minority serving institutions.

“The online Master’s program in the Data Science Specialization will equip students with the knowledge needed for a career in data analytics. Students will then be ready to move to various jobs in government labs, industry or academia,” said Bahram Mobasher, Professor of Physics and Observational Astronomy at UCR and Principal Investigator of the FIELDS program.

Launched in 2013, the online master’s now offers six specializations: Data Science, Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Materials at the Nanoscale, and Mechanical Engineering.

The course material for the online master’s program is equivalent to the traditional master’s program, but with a greater emphasis on technical skills rather than research. Recorded courses, which maintain the same University of California standards as traditional courses, are available for students to watch at convenient times. Students are required to take nine courses for a total of 36 units to graduate, which can be completed in as little as 13 months.

Applications are accepted based on work experience, college coursework completed, GPA, professional certifications, reference letters and GRE scores. The cost of the program is $3,333 per course, or $30,000 for the nine-course program.

Offering a Data Science for Engineering students is a great example of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar. UCR is dedicated to educating the next generation of student in facets where the can make the biggest impact on the community and the world.

More information about UCR’s Online Master of Science in Engineering is here: http://www.msol.ucr.edu/

To read the full article, click here.

Summer Science Camp For Teens at La Sierra University

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Max Gutierrez and published in La Sierra University on May 12, 2016.)

Photo Credit: Natan Vigna
Photo Credit: La Sierra

Summer Science Camp will offer two weeks with unique experiences. Biomedical Science Week will take place from Mon., June 20 to Fri., June 24. Science Explorations Week will take place from Mon., June 27 to Fri., July 1.

Students in Biomedical Science Week will immerse themselves in the sciences within various healthcare professions. They will be able to explore Loma Linda University’s medical center, schools and centers with two days of learning that will include work with professionals and hands-on experience. They will spend time investigating areas such as pharmacy, nursing, radiography, epidemiology, emergency medicine, dentistry, prosthetics, and more. They will also spend a day training to become CPR and first aid certified.

During Science Explorations Week, students will have a weeklong journey through a wide-range of sciences. They will have access to the laboratories at La Sierra University and will experiment with and learn about optics, volcanoes, metallic flubber, rollercoasters, and other things. The camp will focus two days on lessons in chemistry and physics. Additionally, campers will spend a day at Disney’s California Adventure theme park in Anaheim where students will learn about the properties of motion, and a day at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach where students will learn about marine biology.

All students who wish to participate must submit an application by June 6. Students must be just entering or completing grades 9-12 and should be able to promptly attend each full day of camp for the week registered. Applicants who meet the requirements will be accepted on a first come, first served basis.

Camps like this are great examples of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar. La Sierra University is dedicated to educating the next generation of students and helping them succeed. These programs play a vital role in strengthening our community’s workforce and job growth.

Space is limited. Tuition is $300 per week. For information and registration visit lasierra.edu/sciencecamp, or contact Program Coordinator Amy Wolf at sciencecamp@lasierra.edu or 951-785-2148. La Sierra University is located at 4500 Riverwalk Parkway, Riverside. A campus map is available at http://lasierra.edu/campus-map/.

To read the full article, click here.

Two UCR Students Awarded Anne Siebert Scholarship

(This article contains excerpts from www.otpa.org.)

Photo Credit: Old Towne Preservation Association
Photo Credit: Old Towne Preservation Association

Two UCR students received some help towards their education this month. Carolyn Schutten and Nicolette Rohr both received a $1000 Anne Siebert Scholarship from Old Towne Preservation Assocation. Both students are pursuing a Ph.D. in Public History with Historic Preservation Specialty and are expected to graduate next year.

Our community uses land and repurposes historic structures to provide excellent jobs, support to businesses and steward our heritage and natural beauty. Riverside is working everyday to embrace intelligent growth within all facets of the community.

Purpose

Photo Credit: Old Towne Preservation Association
Photo Credit: Old Towne Preservation Association

Established in 1986, The Old Towne Preservation Association is a public benefit nonprofit organization, committed to the preservation, protection and enhancement of Old Towne, Orange, California. The one square mile area of Old Towne Orange contains over 1,400 historically significant, pre-1940 structures. In 1997, Old Towne Orange became a National Historic District and was placed in the National Register of Historic Places.

OTPA established The Anne Siebert Academic Scholarship program to provide financial assistance opportunities to individuals pursuing degrees or certificates in the field of historic preservation at educational institutions in the greater Los Angeles area. The scholarship is administered and granted by the Old Towne Preservation Association, and is named in honor of the late Anne Siebert, a prominent local historic preservation volunteer and advocate. As a result, the community benefits from individuals whose commitment to our cultural resources will be strengthened, and who ultimately will contribute valuable leadership perspectives in the field of historic preservation.

For more information about the Anne Siebert Scholarship, click here.

UCR: Persisting In Science

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Sean Nealon and published in UCR Today on April 12, 2016.)

UCR Distinguished Professor of Genetics Susan Wessler works with students in the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory. PHOTO BY LONNIE DUKA
UCR Distinguished Professor of Genetics Susan Wessler works with students in the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory.
PHOTO BY LONNIE DUKA

The University of California, Riverside has received a five-year, $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation to provide scholarships, academic support, research experience and internships for a small group of sophomores majoring in science.

The pilot project, known as PERSIST (Promoting Engagement, Retention and Success in STEM Training), will help 12 sophomores who demonstrate financial need each year, for a total of 60 scholarships over five years. Each student will receive a $10,000 scholarship.

The funding will build upon the success UC Riverside’s College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences has had with first-year learning communities, which bring together small groups of first-year students, placing them in the same science and math classes and providing extra academic support.

Graduation rates have nearly doubled in the college for learning community participants and first-quarter GPAs for those in learning communities have averaged about a third of a letter grade better.

The PERSIST National Science Foundation grant builds on that success and focuses on sophomores because data shows that students majoring in the STEM fields are most likely to drop out as freshman or sophomores.

For example, about 40 percent of students who enter UC Riverside intending to major in STEM fields drop out of those fields within their first two years, according to the most recent data available. In the third year only about 10 percent more students drop out.

“The key really is the first two years, especially for our first-generation and low-income students,” said Michael McKibben, divisional dean of student academic affairs in the College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences and the proposal’s primary author. “We have made great progress in the first year. Now, with this grant, we will be able to start to address the second year.  Our ultimate goal is to reduce the rate of lower division student attrition in STEM majors.”

In addition to McKibben, others involved with the project are: Susan Wessler, a distinguished professor of genetics; Marsha Ing, an associate professor in the Graduate School of Education; and Jack Eichler, an associate teaching professor in the Department of Chemistry.

The scholarships will decrease the need for low-income students to work part-time and increase their opportunities to be involved in second year undergraduate research and internships.

The academic support will include activities such as a research methodology course, peer mentoring and career exploration workshops with alumni, including a biotechnology career exploration workshop at the Keck Graduate Institute in Claremont, which offers graduate degrees that prepare students for the bioscience industry.

Part of the reason for partnering with the Keck Graduate Institute is to expose the students to the broad range of jobs available to graduates with STEM degrees. Many incoming UC Riverside students come in intent on going to medical school, without knowing or thinking about the much wider range of jobs available, Wessler said.

Participants will be selected from second-year students who went through the first-year learning community and started their freshman year in pre-calculus. These students tend to have lower graduation rates in STEM compared to students who arrive ready to take calculus.

Grants like this are great examples of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar. UCR is dedicated to educating the next generation of students and helping them succeed. These programs play a vital role in strengthening our community’s workforce and job growth.

To read the full article, click here.

Getty Foundation Awards UCR ARTSblock $225,000

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Mojgan Sherkat and published in UCR Today on April 12, 2016.)

Hector Hernandez, Bulca, 2015 (detail). COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND UCR ARTSBLOCK
Hector Hernandez, Bulca, 2015 (detail).
COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND UCR ARTSBLOCK

The Getty Foundation awarded the University of California, Riverside ARTSblock a $225,000 grant for “Mundos Alternos: Art and Science Fiction in the Americas,” an exhibition that brings together contemporary artists over the last three decades from across the Americas who have tapped into science fiction’s capacity to imagine new realities and alternate worlds.

“Based on our extensive research ‘Mundos Alternos’ will include large-scale kinetic works, sculptures, photographs, drawings, paintings, costumes, and video works by more than 30 artists,” said Tyler Stallings, the interim executive director of UCR ARTSblock.

The grant follows a $125,000 award given to UCR ARTSblock in 2014 for research toward the conception of the exhibition, which allowed for curatorial travel, research, and planning. Co-curated by Stallings, Joanna Szupinska-Myers, curator of exhibitions at California Museum of Photography at UCR ARTSblock, and Robb Hernández, assistant professor of English at UCR, the trio had the opportunity to meet with artists and scholars in cities throughout the U.S., Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and South America.

The exhibition will encompass the 8,000 square feet that comprise the changing exhibition galleries at UCR ARTSblock’s three venues – California Museum of Photography, Culver Center of the Arts, and Sweeney Art Gallery. It is expected to travel to other venues, accompanied by a heavily illustrated book that includes original essays, art and science fiction by the curators and leading scholars with expertise in Mexico, Brazil, and Central America.

“Mundos Alterno” will utilize the world’s largest holding of science fiction materials, the Eaton Collection of Science Fiction and Fantasy in the UCR Libraries. In 2012, the Eaton Collection acquired a major collection of science fiction and fantasy pulp magazines published in Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and Spain.

“Science fiction offers a unique artistic landscape in which to explore the colonial enterprise that shaped the Americas, and to present alternative perspectives speculating on the past and the future,” said Szupinska-Myers.

“‘Mundos Alternos’ is a historic show placing UCR at the forefront of the first transnational effort to identify a growing tendency in contemporary Latin American and Latino art, a tendency that recasts ‘the future’ at a time when debates over immigration reform, militarized borders, and American citizenship continue to take center stage in this country,” said Hernández.

“This exhibition is particularly apt for UCR as it is a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), which is reflected not only on the campus but in the surrounding community, too,” said Milagros Peña, dean of the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (CHASS) at UCR. UCR was named an HSI in 2008, the first in the UC system to receive the honor.

“Mundos Alterno” is part of “Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA,” a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles, taking place from September 2017 through January 2018 at more than 60 cultural institutions from Santa Barbara to San Diego, and from Los Angeles to Palm Springs. “Pacific Standard Time” is an initiative of the J. Paul Getty Museum. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America.

“All of ‘Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA’s’ exhibitions are grounded in significant original research carried out by teams of curators – including scholars, artists, and critics – in the United States, Latin America, and Europe,” said Deborah Marrow, director of the Getty Foundation. “The fruits of their collaborative research will be evident in the resulting exhibitions. The exhibitions will also leave a lasting legacy of scholarship through numerous catalogues and other publications. The Getty Foundation is proud to support all of this work.”

UCR ARTSblock is located at 3824 and 3834 Main St., Riverside, Calif., and includes three venues: California Museum of Photography, Barbara and Art Culver Center of the Arts, and the Jack and Marilyn Sweeney Art Gallery, which are open Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m., plus 6-9 p.m. for First Thursday ArtWalks. Admission is $3, which includes entry to all three venues, and is free during First Thursday ArtWalks. For film screenings, the Culver Center opens 30 minutes prior to the start time. www.artsblock.ucr.edu.

This grant is a great example of Seizing Our Destiny’s Intelligent Growth Pillar.  Riverside embraces economic growth and directs it so it maintains and improves our already outstanding quality of life. This includes growing the economy, raising the standard of living and managing a growing population.

To read the full article, click here.

Public Policy Degree For Medical Students Offered

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Bettye Miller and published in UCR Today on April 11, 2016.)

Photo Credit: UCR Today
Photo Credit: UCR Today

The School of Public Policy at the University of California, Riverside will expand its graduate degree programs this fall with a Master of Public Policy designed for medical students interested in health care policy and reform.

The MD-MPP program is open only to students enrolled in the UCR School of Medicine, who will complete their medical and public policy training in five years. Medical degrees typically take four years to complete; the MPP is a two-year program.

“This is a niche degree that would appeal to students who, in addition to becoming practicing physicians, may want to become health care administrators and health policymakers,” explained Anil Deolalikar, dean of the School of Public Policy (SPP). “A lot of people creating health policy have very little medical training. It would help if physicians were more involved in shaping health policy.”

The new program reflects the importance both the School of Public Policy and School of Medicine place on developing public policymakers and physicians who will serve the Inland Empire. Areas that students can work in include federal and state health care policy, medical leadership advocacy, and health care consulting.

“We are pleased to partner with UCR’s School of Public Policy to create this distinctive concurrent degree program,” said Neal L. Schiller, interim dean of the School of Medicine. “This new program will offer our medical students yet another pathway to build leadership skills necessary for developing innovations in the health care system to benefit patients and the inland Southern California region as a whole.”

Students who enroll in the program will spend a full academic year at the School of Public Policy during what would have been their fourth year of medical school, then return to the School of Medicine the following year to finish their final year of medical education. They will complete a summer internship and a capstone project that is acceptable to both professional schools. Upon completion of the fourth year of medical school and the concurrent degree capstone project, students will be awarded two degrees: Doctor of Medicine (MD) and Master of Public Policy (MPP).

“By partnering with the UCR School of Public Policy, our medical students will learn the skills needed to help influence healthcare policy that will in turn help fulfill our mission in a meaningful way,” said Dr. Michael Nduati, associate dean of clinical affairs at the UCR School of Medicine. “We are thrilled to have this opportunity available for our students.  Health care reform affects all physicians and providers – from access to reimbursement. Increasingly more and more in recent years, major shifts in the health care landscape are being determined by policymakers and legislation.  The MD-MPP program equips future physicians to take a central role in health care policy and programming that will shape the future of health care in California and throughout the nation.”

Both the School of Public Policy and the School of Medicine are enrolling students who want to improve the quality of life for residents of the Inland Empire, Deolalikar said.

“We are focused on developing future leaders whose training in public policy is grounded in the scientific approach, not armchair activism,” he said. “You have to have proper rigorous training in public policy to say what policies this region needs to make life better for everyone here. We need people who can produce the data, analyze policy options, and make sound recommendations.”

The School of Public Policy may pair the MPP with other graduate degree programs, such as the Master of Business Administration, and offer public policy certificates to Ph.D. students in a variety of disciplines, Deolalikar said.

“If a student has a public policy track in addition to their Ph.D. program, for example, if their dissertation is on the public policy aspect of environmental engineering, that opens a new set of career options,” he added.

Offering a Public Policy degree for medical students is a great example of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar. UCR is dedicated to educating the next generation of student in facets where the can make the biggest impact on the community and the world.

More information about the MD/MPP program is available at http://spp.ucr.edu/mpp/md.html and http://medschool.ucr.edu/mep/md_mpp.html.

To read the full article, click here.

Aviation Students Land Jobs Offers

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Madison De Genner and published in CBU Banner on March 30, 2016.)

Photo Credit: CBU Banner
Photo Credit: CBU Banner

Four students from California Baptist University’s aviation flight program received conditional job offers within the last few months from growing airplane company, ExpressJet Airlines.

Although CBU’s aviation flight program is only three years old, ExpressJet Airlines took interest from the start, partnering with CBU to introduce itself to prospective pilots through the “Pathway Program.”

Kyle LeVesque, senior aviation flight major, said the Pathway Program is ExpressJet Airlines’ method of giving aviation students at CBU a guaranteed interview opportunity.

“You have to fulfill specific requirements through a three-step interview process, maintain your GPA, get all your training done, work as a flight instructor and get the minimum hour requirement to apply for a job in the industry,” he said.

All four students passed ExpressJet’s sample test, written knowledge exam, technical interview and human resource interview, leading them to conditional job offers.

“They cannot guarantee a job, but if you satisfy all of those requirements, then they give you a conditional job offer,” LeVesque said, “which is basically saying, ‘Once you meet the hour requirements and do your training, call us up and we’ll set a date for you to come and join the new hire class day.’”

The offer is conditional because each student must first complete all of his or her training before the offer can be sanctioned.

“Most likely, if you get the offer, you are going to stay committed and dedicated because you want to do well,” LeVesque said.

The other students expressed their anticipation and relief over the offers.

“I am very excited and relieved to have a job waiting for me after college,” said Hannah Guajardo, junior aviation flight major.

Amanda Snodgrass, junior aviation flight major, said the offers are a measure of the aviation flight program’s success.

“It is nice to have that opportunity in my back pocket for when I reach eligibility,” she said. “I feel very proud of my accomplishment and everyone else’s, as well. It shows how good of a program CBU has built.”

Howard Dang, junior aviation flight major, said he has been in love with aircrafts since he was a little child.

“I’ve always been fascinated by the unique aspects that make airplanes work,” Dang said. “It’s my dream to become a pilot so it’s definitely a great feeling knowing that I have a job waiting for me after graduation. I believe that if we work hard and believe in God, anything is possible.”

CBU’s efforts and commitment to education certainly illustrate the Seizing Our Destiny pillar of intelligent growth.  For students, one of the greatest challenges they meet is finding a career path after graduation.  Providing students with the opportunity of future employment while they are completing their training at Cal Baptist holds great value to aviation science students.   This is just one example of how Cal Baptist University promotes intelligent growth by collaborating to build a stronger community for future Riversiders.

To read the full article, click here.

La Sierra Rolls Out First Robotics Summer Camp

(This article contains excerpts from the article written by Darla Martin Tucker and published in La Sierra News/Events on March 24, 2016.)

In this 2015 photo, La Sierra Academy sophomore Lewis Keyes, left, reads instructions on how to make a connection on an Adruino microcontroller board while academy sophomore Cory Cheesebro carries out the task. The students were participating in a robotics club led by La Sierra University computer science Professor Enoch Hwang. (Photo courtesy of Enoch Hwang)
In this 2015 photo, La Sierra Academy sophomore Lewis Keyes, left, reads instructions on how to make a connection on an Adruino microcontroller board while academy sophomore Cory Cheesebro carries out the task. The students were participating in a robotics club led by La Sierra University computer science Professor Enoch Hwang. (Photo courtesy of Enoch Hwang)

Robotics Summer Camp, scheduled over two weeks between June 13 – 24 will provide participants ages 9 and up with hands-on activities that teach robotics, computer programming, electronics, and analytical thinking. The summer camp will conclude with a robot-building competition in which the winners will take home their robots.

Participants will use an Arduino kit to build their robots. The kit cost is included in the camp registration fee and comes with the Adruino microcontroller board, USB cable, LEDs, buzzer, push button, various sensors, motor and other components.

“It’s been my passion to work with electronics and robotics, even when I was a kid,” said Enoch Hwang, organizer of the camp and computer science department chair at La Sierra. “I enjoy teaching others the knowledge I have gained.”

Hwang also leads a robotics club at La Sierra in which he and a group of students with interests in robotics meet regularly to build fun electronic gadgets. Members of the club will assist with the summer camp activities.

BK Precision Corp., a Yorba Linda-based manufacturer of test and measurement instruments and Global Specialties, a maker of electronic training products also headquartered in Yorba Linda, serve as robotics camp sponsors.

Robotic technology is a burgeoning market that is breaking barriers in ways previously thought not possible, according to various reports. For some, an interest in robotics could lead to a future career in a new arena. A robotics market report published by Business Insider in May 2015 predicts a $1.5 billion market for consumer and business robots by 2019, with a growth rate seven times faster than the market for manufacturing robots.

“Getting first-hand experience in making a robot may enlighten camp participants to pursue a future career in computer and electronics engineering, which is predicted as one of the fastest growing job markets for the next decade,” Hwang said.

Riverside’s initiative to promote and encourage STEM education is a model of Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.  STEM education plays a vital role in strengthening our community’s workforce and job growth.

Robotics Summer Camp will be held June 13 – 24, Mon. – Fri., 9 a.m. – 12 noon at La Sierra’s Price Science Complex, Room 147. Registration is $80 per person. Registration deadline is May 31. An early-bird discount of 10% will be applied with online registration and payment before May 11.

For registration and information visit www.RobotsForFun.com, or email info@robotsforfun.com. La Sierra University is located at 4500 Riverwalk Parkway, Riverside. A campus map is available at http://lasierra.edu/campus-map/.

To read the full article, click here.