Riverside Ranks #8 in Forbes’ Coolest Cities In America!

(This article contains excerpts from an article published on Forbes.com)

Forbes just released a list a of America’s “Coolest” Cities, and Riverside ranked #8.  How do you define “cool”?  According to Erin Carlyle, Forbes staff, “We sought to quantify it in terms of cities, partnering with Sperling’s BestPlaces to rank the 60 largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Metropolitan Divisions (cities and their surrounding suburbs, as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget) based on six data points we weighted evenly.”  The six data points used to rank the cities include: arts and culture, reacreation, diversity, local eats, population age, and net migration.

Arts & Culture Index: 88, Recreation Index: 93, Diversity Index: 77.27, Local Eats: 72.2%, Population age 20-34: 29.7%, 2010 - 2013 Net Migration: 1.8%.  Photo credit: Forbes.com

Arts & Culture Index: 88, Recreation Index: 93, Diversity Index: 77.27, Local Eats: 72.2%, Population age 20-34: 29.7%, 2010 – 2013 Net Migration: 1.8%. Photo credit: Forbes.com

Although many might dispute that Riverside should be #1 on the list, being ranked one of the “coolest” cities in the country is an outstanding representation of our beloved city being a true location of choice.  Riverside has proven to be an attractive place for all types of residents, workers, professionals, entrepreneurs, and visitors.  Riversiders take pride in our beloved city with countless opportunities to be entertained, amazed, and inspired.     That is why the City of Riverside will continue to become a location of choice for people and organizations from allover the world.

To read the full article, click here.

 

 

Entrepreneurs Team Up Under One Roof

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Laurie Lucas, published in the Press-Enterprise on July 13, 2014)

Three Inland Empire entrepreneurs with enough chops and hops to go pro have tapped into an unusual business model to keep their home drafts flowing.  Brad McCauley, 31, Jason Castonguay, 38, and Philip Vieira, 29, are exceptionally bright science and computer geeks with a thirst for creating innovative beers and ales. But they lack the big bucks for a startup.

Brad McCauley, 31, Jason Castonguay, 38, and Philip Vieira, 29, left to right, are three brewers sharing facilities in an “incubator” for home brewers provided by Brew Crew, who hold the lease in a Riverside building. Photo credit: Kurt Miller.

Brad McCauley, 31, Jason Castonguay, 38, and Philip Vieira, 29, left to right, are three brewers sharing facilities in an “incubator” for home brewers provided by Brew Crew, who hold the lease in a Riverside building. Photo credit: Kurt Miller.

The concept is to help nanobrewing neophytes shed their amateur status by allowing them to work in a collaborative space where they can share equipment, develop recipes in a commercial setting and test-market directly to the public.

It is interesting to see entrepreneurs collaborating to help build each others brands by sharing knowledge and equipment, the brewers at Brew Crew Inc exemplify Seizing Our Destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.  Working everyday to harness entrepreneurial spirit within the community, Riverside embraces economic growth and directs it so it maintains and improves our already outstanding quality of life. 

Brew Crew, an 1,800-square-foot manufacturing and retail facility at Suite G, 11626 Sterling Ave., contains two brewing systems, a walk-in cooler to store kegs and a bar with 16 taps. There’s seating for 50, 25 in the store front and 25 in the warehouse when brewing isn’t happening.

The trio of brewers are contract laborers working under the umbrella of a single corporation, Brew Crew, which leases the building. Its co-founders, CEO McCauley and Vince Pileggi, chief business officer, scrambled for 18 months to obtain all of the licensing and permits before opening the brewery and tap room six weeks ago. Depending on drink sizes, prices run from $1.50 to $7. There’s no food served, but customers may bring their own.  “There are a lot of home brew clubs in this area that have amazing brewers,” Pileggi said. The goal is to provide the resources “to incubate” fledgling brewers who hope to eventually take wing on their own. “We’re finding the best talent we can and courting others who can benefit and grow,” he said.

To read more, click here.

 

Don’t Miss Restaurant Week In Riverside

(This article contains excerpts from riversideca.gov/dineriverside/)

Be sure to participate in Riverside Restaurant Week, and take advantage of all the great deals and discounts available.  Help support local restaurants and dine within the city.

Riverside Restaurant Week exemplifies seizing our destiny’s intelligent growth pillar.  Participating restaurants throughout the city are being highlighted to promote the great dining experiences  available to Riversiders.   Our city promotes an outstanding quality of life for all through intelligent growth.

Click here to see what restaurants are participating!

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When is Riverside Restaurant Week?

Friday, June 20, 2014 through Sunday, June 29th.

Do I need to register?

No, registration is not necessary. As you dine at each participating restaurant, just let them know you’re there for the Riverside Restaurant Week special! Reservations are encouraged for those restaurants that accept them.

Who is supporting the event?

The City of Riverside alongside Riverside Downtown Partnership and Arlington Business Partnership.

For more information on Riverside Restaurant Week, click here.

 

Retention Of Students In STEM Fields Receives Major Financial Boost

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Iqbal Pittalwala, published in UCR Today on May 29, 2014.)

UC Riverside receives $2.4 million Howard Hughes Medical Institute grant for STEM education; underrepresented minority students to especially benefit.

UCR Distinguished Professor of Genetics Susan Wessler works with students in the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory. Photo credit: Lonnie Duka

UCR Distinguished Professor of Genetics Susan Wessler works with students in the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory.
Photo credit: Lonnie Duka

Sixty percent of students in the United States who begin college intending to major in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) fail to earn a STEM degree. Even more concerning is that only 20 percent of students from underrepresented ethnic groups persist in STEM studies.

To help address this higher education crisis, the University of California, Riverside has received a five-year grant totaling $2.4 million from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) to fund a project aimed at addressing the challenges to STEM success faced by some students — particularly, students from underrepresented minority groups at UC Riverside.

Freshmen perform experiments in the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory.  Photo credit: James Burnette lll

Freshmen perform experiments in the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory. Photo credit: James Burnette III

Specifically, the grant will allow the project, titled “Sustaining Academic Leadership for STEM Achievement” (HHMI-SALSA), to provide lower division science students with early research immersion as well as career exploration and mentoring, using an already successful first-year “learning community” program at UCR as the feeder pipeline. Those students successfully retained through the lower division will be handed off into upper division research, internship and career opportunities.

The HHMI-SALSA grant is an outstanding opportunity for UCR to focus on STEM education, and develop potential career paths.  Certainly a model of seizing our destiny’s intelligent growth pillar, UCR is working everyday to embrace intelligent growth within all facets of higher education.

Susan Wessler (left) is seen here with Rochelle Campbell, whose generous gifts helped finance the expansion of the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory. Photo credit: Carrie Rosema

Susan Wessler (left) is seen here with Rochelle Campbell, whose generous gifts helped finance the expansion of the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory. Photo credit: Carrie Rosema

According to Wessler, the holder of a University of California President’s Chair, the timing of the grant is ideal because a National Science Foundation STEP grant UCR received last year has increased the capacity of the learning communities, which help generate the Dynamic Genome course students.  In combination with this NSF grant, the HHMI-SALSA grant will give UCR greater capacity for critical programmatic enhancements to help retain undergraduate students in STEM majors.

To read the full article, click here.

Riverside Tops The List Of Best Cities For Small Business

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Amy Whyte, published in inc.com on May 12, 2014.)

A new study from Biz2Credit.com examines how a number of U.S. cities measure up and Riverside tops the chart as best city for small business when ranked by annual revenue.  See the infographic chart below. 

Infographic map comparing major cities based on annual revenue and average credit score.  Photo credit: shutter stock

Infographic map comparing major cities based on annual revenue and average credit score. Photo credit: Biz2Credit.com

The study, which defines a small business as a company with fewer than 250 employees or less than $10 million in annual revenue, analyzed more than 12,000 businesses that have been in operation for at least a year. The findings place San Jose in the top spot, on the basis of a weighted score that includes annual revenue, credit scores, and the average age of the city’s small businesses. Detroit, Denver, Los Angeles, and San Francisco round out the top five.

This is an outstanding representation of Riverside as a location of choice.  For small businesses across the country, choosing what location to set up shop can be difficult and exhausting.  This type of chart is a useful tool for entrepreneurs to compare big cities side by side.   Riverside attracts creative, entrepreneurial, dynamic and diverse people as residents, workers, business owners and visitors.

To read more, click here.

Eastside Apartments Set For Long-Awaited Overhaul

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Alicia Robinson, published in the Press-Enterprise on March 27, 2014.)

Built in the mid-1960s, the Grand Prix apartments on Seventh Street in Riverside’s Eastside neighborhood have clearly seen better days.

Shonda Herold, housing project coordinator with the city of Riverside, inspects a hole in the ceiling of one of three city-owned apartment buildings on Seventh Street on Wednesday, March 26, 2014. The city plans to replace the old buildings with new affordable housing units. Photo Credit: David Bauman

Shonda Herold, housing project coordinator with the city of Riverside, inspects a hole in the ceiling of one of three city-owned apartment buildings on Seventh Street on Wednesday, March 26, 2014. The city plans to replace the old buildings with new affordable housing units. Photo Credit: David Bauman

The seafoam-green paint is peeling from the wood trim on the boxy, flat-roofed building, and the kidney-shaped pool was long ago filled with dirt that has sprouted weeds. Now vacant and boarded up, the complex is weeks from being demolished, the first big step in a city plan to improve the neighborhood officials call Chicago/Linden because it’s near that intersection.

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Photo Credit: David Bauman

Within two years, the Grand Prix and two other apartment buildings on the block will be replaced by an affordable housing complex that will have something for the community – a public garden, children’s play area or a child care facility. It’s part of an estimated $16.8 million strategy to make the area safer and more attractive for those who live there.

Fixing up the area, which lies between Chicago and Dwight avenues and West Linden and Seventh streets, has been a priority for city officials since 2006, housing project coordinator Shonda Herold said.

The overall strategy, created by a consultant with community input, includes installing new landscaping and more streetlights, improving driveways and alleys, reopening two cul-de-sacs that have become places for loitering, and building a community center at Patterson Park that could offer library programs, a commercial kitchen for public use, and activities for youths and seniors.

Photo Credit: David Bauman

Photo Credit: David Bauman

Officials expect the process of building community support and involvement to take time, just as finding money and fixing buildings will. Councilman Andy Melendrez, who represents the area, said he’s heard mostly positive feedback and excitement about plans for the neighborhood. He said he knows making the plans a reality is “not anything that’s going to happen from one year to the next.”

Transforming old spaces into new places throughout the city is what makes Riverside a location of choice.  With the mission to improve quality of life in Riverside, our community takes pride on maintaining it’s well defined, welcoming neighborhoods.

To read the full article, click here.

 

Council Votes To Add Sister City In Vietnam

(This article contains excerpts from article by Alicia Robinson, published in the Press-Enterprise on March 18, 2014.)

INTERNATIONAL SISTERS

Riverside will add Can Tho, Vietnam, to its already large collection of sister cities.  Riverside has sister city relationships with Sendai, Japan; Ensenada and Cuautla, Mexico; Obuasi, Ghana; Hyderabad, India; Gangnam, South Korea; Jiangmen, China; and Erlangen, Germany.

The ideas of “people to people” relationships and healing after war won out Tuesday, March 18, when the Riverside City Council narrowly voted to add Can Tho, Vietnam, as its ninth sister city.  The decision came after lengthy and impassioned public comments on the goals of the sister city program and whether having such a relationship in Vietnam would disrespect American veterans.

“The purpose is to promote peace and common understanding,” said Bill Gavitt, a Vietnam veteran. “It’s time to start helping others if we want to change their behavior.”

Vien Doan, a Vietnamese American physician who lives in Riverside, has spearheaded efforts to add Can Tho, Vietnam, to Riverside's sister city program.  Photo Credit:  Alicia Robinson

Vien Doan, a Vietnamese American physician who lives in Riverside, has spearheaded efforts to add Can Tho, Vietnam, to Riverside’s sister city program. Photo Credit: Alicia Robinson

The vote was 4-3. Councilmen Chris Mac Arthur, Steve Adams and Mike Soubirous dissented.

Riverside was among the earliest participants in the sister city program, which was created in 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to foster cultural, educational and economic exchange between countries. Riverside formed ties with Sendai, Japan, in 1957 and has since added sister cities in South Korea, China, India, Ghana and Germany, and two in Mexico.

Vien Doan, a Vietnamese American physician who lives in Riverside, helped revive the idea of a sister city in his native country in 2012. He personally met with veterans’ groups in the past year and a half to build support for the plan.  “We have every reason to hate communism,” he said, describing how his family was rescued by American soldiers during the war. “I will never forget the past, but the past will not determine my future.”

Mayor William “Rusty” Bailey has said his office spends about $10,000 on the sister city program annually, but most other costs are borne by the International Relations Council, a private nonprofit group that oversees the friendships and raises money for related events and travel.

Like Riverside, Can Tho is home to a university and a medical college, and it’s an agricultural center producing fruit and rice.

Adding Can Tho to Riverside’s collection of international sister cities is a model of the seizing our destiny pillar, unified city.  We are a caring community that has compassion for all of its inhabitants, and engages with one another for a better life for all.

Riversiders respect and value the cultural heritage, distinct needs and varied input of each of our neighbors, while proactively engaging them across historical dividing lines.  Riversiders are working together everyday to not only address local issues, but to also have a positive impact on the region, nation and world…

To read the full article, click here.

Riverside Maker of Aerospace Component Soars in New Directions

(This article contains excerpts from an article by Laurie Lucas published in the Press Enterprise on March 07, 2014)

STAN LIM/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER  Henri Rahmon, left, and Iggy Araujo are owners of Accuturn Corporation, a Riverside-based company that makes parts as small as a grain of sand for the aerospace, military, medical, dental and other industries.

STAN LIM/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Henri Rahmon, left, and Iggy Araujo are owners of Accuturn Corporation, a Riverside-based company that makes parts as small as a grain of sand for the aerospace, military, medical, dental and other industries.

Accuturn Corporation is a manufacturer of precision components, such as screws and washers, for aerospace, medical, dental, computer and other industries. At the controls since 2006, Iggy Araujo, 59, Henri Rahmon, 47 and a silent partner, have doubled annual sales, branched into the medical, automotive, computer, defense and dental industries and added state-of-the-art machinery that can make screws as small as a grain of sand or as fine as a strand of hair. These miniscule components, manufactured from stainless steel, titanium, gold and other materials, wind up in everything from cameras, tooth implants, orthopedic devices, drone antennas and Boeing cockpit panels to Caterpillar joysticks.

STAN LIM/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER   Parts much smaller than a penny manufactured at Accuturn.

STAN LIM/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Parts much smaller than a penny manufactured at Accuturn.

Business has taken off since the two immigrants bought a Riverside manufacturer of aerospace parts. In fact, like other successful innovation focused businesses in the city of Riverside; Accuturn has outgrown its location at 6510 Box Springs Road and is poised to expand its markets in Europe, South America and Canada. Rahmon said they’re pacing themselves, but expect to keep growing in strong, overseas markets. “We have a good name, low production costs and a quick turnaround,” he said. “And we have Iggy. He IS Accuturn.”

Riverside is a location of choice for people and organizations from all over the world; attracting a dynamic and diverse people as its residents and business owners. To read the full article click here.